Skip to main content

Full text of "A brief exposition of the doctrine of the New church, which is meant by the New Jerusalem in the Apocalypse"

See other formats


BX 
< 8712 
.18 

183 9 



± /3 



LIBRARY 

or THE 

Theological Seminary, 

PRINCETON, N. J. 

C<t BX 8712 .B8 1839 

' S7 ' S ^^2 nb ° rg ' Emanuel > 1688 



A brief exposition of thp 



\ 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2014 



https://archive.org/details/briefexpositionoOOswed 



BRIEF EXPOSITION 



DOCTRINE 



THE NEW CHURCH, 



WHICH IS MEANT BY THE 



NEW JERUSALEM IN THE APOCALYPSE. 



TRANSLATED FJK5M THE LATIN OF 

EMANUEL "SWEDENBORG, 

ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED AT AMSTERDAM IN THE YEAf 



I John saw the holy city, Now Jerusalem, coming down from Go<] out of heaven, pro- 
pared aa a Bride adorned lor lier lliediuud. And He that 6at upon the throne said 
Behold 1 make all things new: and He said unto me, Write, lor these words are true 
and faithful ApocALvrss, chap. xxi. verso 2, 5. 



liojston : 

PUBLISHED BY OTIS CLAPP, 

121 Washington Street. 



1839. 



CONTENTS. 



Page 

INTRODUCTION 1 

The Doctrmak of the R an Catholics confer s J ust i lioat i.in, from the Council of 

Trent . 1 

The Doctrinals <.l* tho Protestants concerning Justification, from the Formula Con- 
cordite 5 

A Sketch of the Doctrinals of the New Church 14 

1 lie Disagreements between the Tenets of the Old and New Church, considered un- 
der XXV Articles from page 14 to C3 

I. That the Churches, which by the Reformation separated themselves from 
the Roman Catholic Church, dissent in various Points of Doctrine ; but that 
they all agree in the Articles concerning a Trinity of Persons in the God- 
head, Original Si.i from Adam, Imputation of the Merit of Christ, and Jus- 

II. Thai' the Roman i aili.,1 irs, 'before. 'tlx' ReVonna't io'n','h'e'ld anil taught exact- 
ly the same Things as the Reformed did alter it, in Respect to the four Arti- 
cles above mentioned, namely, a Trinity of Persons in the Godhead, Original 
Sin, Imputation ot'the Merit of Christ, and Justification by Faith therein ; 
only with this diflerence, that they conjoined that Faith with Charity or 
Good Works 16 

III. That the leading Reformers, Luther, Melancthon, and Calvin, retained all 
the Tenets concerning a Trinity of Persons in the Godhead, Original Sin, 
Imputation of I lie Abuts of Christ, and Justification by Faith, just as they 
were and had been among the Roman Catholics ; but that they separated 
Charity or Good Works from that Faith, and declared that they were not at 
the same Time of a saving Efficacy, with a View to ho totally severed from 
the Roman Catholics as to the vcry'L'ssciitlals of the Church, which are Faith 
and Charity 17 

IV. That nevertheless the leading Reformers adjoined Good Works, and even 
con joined them, to their Faith, but in Man as a passive Subject; whereas 
the Roman Catholics conjoin them in Man as an active Subject ; and that 
notwithstanding there is actually a Conformity between the one and the 
other as to Faith, Works, and Merits 18 

V. That the w hole System of Theology i" the Christian World, at this Day, is 
founded on an Idea of Three Gods', arising from the Doctrine of a Trinity 

of Persons 20 

VI. That tho Tenetsof the aforesaid Theology appear to be erroneous, after the 
Idea of a Trinity of Persons, and the consentient Idea of Three Gods, has been 
rejected, and the Idea of One God, in whom is a Divine Trinity, received in 
its stead 24 

VII. That then true saving Faith, which is a Faith in One God, united with Good 
Works, is acknowledged and received 25 

VIII. And that this Faith is in God the Saviour Jesus Christ, which in its simple 
Form is as follows : I. That tbero is One God, in whom is a Divine Trinity, 
and that He is the Lord Jesus Christ. II. That saving Faith is to believe in 
Him. III. That evils ought to be shunned, because they are of the Devil and 
from the Devil. IV. That Good Works ought to be done, because they are of 
God and from God. V. And that they ought to be done by Alan as of himself, 
but with a belief, that they arc from the Lord, operating in Him and bv Him 26 

IX. That the Faith of the present Day has separated Religion from the Chu- h, 
since Religion consists in the Acknowledgment of One God, and i.i the 
Worship of Him, from Faith grounded in Charily 28 

X. That the Faith of the presen'. Church cannot bo conjoined with Charity, 
and produce any Fruits, which arc Good Works 30 

XI. That from the Faith of the present Church, there results a Worsbin of the 
Mouth and not of the Life, whereas the Worship of the Mouth is accepted 
by the Lord, in Proportion as it proceeds from the Worship of tho Idle ... 31 
XII. That the Doctrine of the present Church is interwoven with many Para- 
doxes, which are to be embraced by Faith ; and Hint therefore its Tenets 
gain Admission into the Memory only, and not into any Part of the Un- 
derstanding abovo the Memory, but merely into Confirmations below it . . . 39 
XIII. That the Tenets of the present Church cannot he learnt and retained with- 
out great Difficulty, nor can they be preached or taught without using great 
Care and Caution to concoal their Nakedness, because sound Reason neither 
discerns uor perceives them 3> 



CONTENTS. 



XIV. That the nomine of the Faith of tin 
man Properties; as that lie hehelcl M 
reconciled, that He is reconciled thruu; 
and hy Mis Intercession ; and that Hi 
of His Son's Sulfeno^s, and thus to 
He imputes the Righteousness of His 
plicatcsitfrouiFaiih a lone ; and tlia. 



l'rcdes.ination ; the 
Men, lint unto Fail 
and Faith; that Ma 
sies ol'lhesainc Kin 
the Holy Supper, as 
■when considered ar< 
as also with Kegai 
the first Agos to tl 



than from t 
XVI. That the la 
hy the Con: 
nod, .Matt. 
XVII. That the li 
Truth, or 

XVIII. That'll,!!' 







Tag* 

scribes to God hu- 
it He required to be 



c rcy ; and that 
Man who sup- 
He makes Him 



of Mercy : 
Aclhons of 
en Charity 
more Hcre- 

•er Source, 



present justin 
his two Beast* 



rusnlcin, Heated ol in II 
called the Bride and the 
XXIV. That the Faith of the ; 

the Faith of the forme 
Collision and Conflict \ 

Church in Man 

XXV. That the Roman C ulm 
the Merit of Christ, MM 
Church was first initial 
temal Forms of Woisl 
fore, if they recede hut 
immediately approach 
holy Eucharist in both I 
or the New Church of I 



I n IT ti ol Hi.' 1 . j ----- r 1 1. 
nets of the Faith of 
wcalypse: "He that 
gs new ; and He said 

," chap. xxi. 5 

Lord, is the New Je- 

x.vii., which is there 

11ns he together with 



Remarks 011 Imputation 67 

Two Memorable Relations taken from ihe Aporalvjise Revealed 73 

ArrcMii v, containing the Faith of the .New Heaven and New Church in its univer- 
sal Form, and three Memorable Relations from the Apocalypse Revealed. . 79 



BRIEF EXPOSITION 

OF THE 

DOCTRINE OF THE NEW CHURCH, 

WHICH IS MEANT BY THE NEW JERUSALEM, 
IN" THE APOCALYPSE. 



1. Several works and tracts having been published by 
me, during some years past, concerning the New Jerusalem, 
whereby is meant a New Church about to be established by 
the Lord, and the Apocalypse having been revealed, I am 
come to a determination to lay before the world a complete- 
view of the doctrine of that church in its full extent ; but, as 
this is a work of some years, I have thought it advisable to 
draw up some sort of sketch thereof, in order that a general 
idea may first be formed of that church and its doctrine ; 
because when general principles precede, then the several 
particulars will appear at full in a clear light, for these enter 
into general principles, as things homogeneous into their 
proper receptacles. This compendium, however, is not 
designed for critical examination, but is barely offered to the 
world by way of information, as its contents will be proved 
at large in the work itself. But it is necessary first to state 
the doctrinals at present maintained concerning justification, 
that the following contrast between the doctrines of the 
present church, and those of the New Church, may be clearly 
understood. 

The Doctrinals of the Roman Catholics concerning 
Justification, from the Council of Trent. 

2. In the bull of pope Pius IV., dated 13th November, 
1564, are the following words : " I embrace and receive every 
thing, both generally and particularly, which the most holy 



2 



A BRIEF EXPOSITION OF THE 



Council of Trent hath determined and declared concerning 
Original Sin and Justification." 

3. From the Council of Trent, concerning Original Sin. 

( a ) That Adam, by his transgression, experienced an entire 
change and depravation of nature, both in body and soul ; 
and that the ill effects of Adam's transgression were not 
confined to himself, but also extended to his posterity ; and 
that it not only transmitted death and corporal sufferings 
upon all mankind, but likewise sin, which is the death of the 
soul, Sess. v. 1, 2. ( b ) That this sin of Adam, which origi- 
nally was a single transgression, and has been transmitted by 
propagation, and not by imitation, is so implanted in the na- 
ture of every man, as to be his own, and cannot be done away 
by any other means than by the merits of the only Saviour 
our Lord Jesus Christ, who hath reconciled us to God by His 
blood, being made unto us righteousness, sanctification, and 
redemption, Sess. v. 3. ( c ) That, by the transgression of 
Adam, all men lost their innocence, and became unclean, and 
by nature the children of wrath, Sess. vi. chap. 1. 

4. Concerning Justification. ( a ) That our heavenly Father, 
the Father of Mercies, sent Christ Jesus his Son into the 
world, in the blessed fullness of time, as well to the Jews who 
were under the law, as to the Gentiles who followed not after 
righteousness, that they might all by hold of righteousness, 
and receive the adoption of sons. Him God offered to be a 
propitiation through faith in His blood, not only for our sins, 
but likewise for the sins of the whole world, Sess. vi. chap. 2. 

( b ) Nevertheless, all do not receive the benefit of His death, 
but only they to whom the merit of His passion is communi- 
cated; so that, unless they are born again in Christ, they cam 
never be justified, Sess. vi. chap. 3. ( 6 j That the beginning 
of justification is to be derived from the preventing grace of 
God through Christ Jesus, that is, from His call, Sess. vi. 
chap. 5. ( c ) That men are disposed to righteousness, when, 
being stirred up by divine grace, and conceiving faith by 
hearing, they are freely moved towards God, believing those 
tilings to be true which are divinely revealed and promised : 
and especially this, that the ungodly are justified by God 
through His grace, through redemption, which is by Christ 
Jesus ; and when, being convinced of sin from the fear of 
divine justice, by which they arc profitably disquieted, they 
are encouraged to hope, and to trust that God, for Chrisl 
sake, will be propitious to them, Sess. vi. chap. <>. ( ') Thi 
the consequence of this disposition and preparation i acti 



DOCTRINE OF THE NEW CHURCH. 



3 



justification, which is not only a remission of sins, but like- 
wise a sanctification and renovation of the interior man, by 
the reception of divine grace and gifts, whereby man from 
being unrighteous becomes righteous, and from being an ene- 
my a friend, so as to be an heir according to the hope of eter- 
nal life, Sess. vi. chap. 7. ( p ) The final cause of justification 
is the glory o r God and of Christ, and life eternal. The effi- 
cient cause is God, who freely cleanses and sanctifies. The 
meritorious cause is the dearly-beloved and only-begotten Son 
of God, our Lord Jesus Christ, who, when we were enemies, 
through the great love wherewith He loved us, by His most 
holy passion upon the cross, merited for us justification, and 
made satisfaction for us to God the Father. The instrumental 
cause is the sacrament of baptism, which is a sacrament of 
faith, without which none can ever be justified. The formal 
cruise is the sole righteousness of God ; not that whereby He 
is righteous Himself, but that whereby He makes us righteous, 
with which being gifted by Him, we are renewed in the spirit 
of our mind ; and are not only reputed righteous, but arc 
truly called righteous, and are so in reality, each according to 
that measure which the Holy Spirit imparts to every one as it 
pleaseth Ilim, Sess. vi. chap. 7, § "2. (' ) That justification 
is a translation from that state, wherein man is born a child 
of the first Adam, into a state of grace and adoption among 
the sons of God by the second Adam, our Saviour Jesus Christ, 
Sess. vi. chap. 4. 

5. Concerning Faith, Charity, Good Works, and Merits. 
( a ) When the apostle declares, that man is justified by faith, 
and freely, these words are to be understood in the sense 
wherein the Catholic church has uniformly held and express- 
ed them, to wit, that we are said to be justified by faith, be- 
cause faith is the commencement of man's salvation, the foun- 
dation and root of all justification, without which it is impos- 
sible to please God, and attain to the fellowship of His chil- 
dren : but we are said to be justified freely, because none of 
those things which precede justification, whether faith or 
works, merit the actual grace of justification ; for if it be 
grace, it is not of works, otherwise grace would not be grace, 
Sess. vi. chap. 8. ('•) Although none can be righteous, but 
they to whom the merits of the passion of our Lord Jesus 
Christ are communicated, nevertheless that is effected in jus- 
tification, when, by the merit of the same most holy passion, 
the love of God is infused by the Holy Ghost into the hearts 
of those who are justified, and abideth in them : hence, in 



4 



A BRIEF EXPOSITION OF THE 



the act of justification, man receives, together with the re- 
mission of his sins, all these things infused into him at once 
by Jesus Christ, in whom he is ingrafted by faith, hope, and 
charity : for faith, unless charity be added to it, neither unites 
perfectly to Christ, nor constitutes a living member of His 
body, Sess. vi. chap. 7, § 3. ( c ) That Christ is not only a 
Redeemer, in whom we are to have faith, but also a Lawgiver, 
whom we must obey, Sess. vi. chap. 10, can. 21. ('') That 
faith without works is dead and vain, because in Christ Je- 
sus neither circumcision availeth any thing, nor uncircum- 
cision, but faith which worketh by love : for faith without hope 
;.nd charity cannot avail unto eternal life ; wherefore also they 
hearken to the word of Christ, " If thou wilt enter into life, 
keep the commandments :" thus they who are born again, 
receiving true Christian righteousness, are commanded to keep 
it white and unspotted, as their first robe, given them by Je- 
sus Christ, instead of that which Adam lost both for himself 
and us by his disobedience, that they may present it before 
the tribunal of our Lord Jesus Christ, and obtain eternal life, 
Sess. vi. chap. 7, § 4. ( e ) That there is a continual influx 
of power from Jesus Christ Himself into those who are justi- 
fied, as from a head into the members, and from a vine into 
the branches ; which power always precedes, accompanies and 
ibllows their good works, and without which they could hot 
by any means be acceptable and meritorious in the sight of 
God ; wherefore we are to believe, that nothing more is want- 
ing to those who arc justified ; but they may be fully assured, 
that by those works which have been wrought in God, they 
have merited eternal life, which will be bestowed upon tlieni 
in due time, Sess. vi. chap. 10. (') When we speak of our 
own righteousness, we do not mean as though it were our own 
from ourselves ; for that which is termed our righteousness, is 
the righteousness of God, being infused into us by God through 
the merit of Christ : far be it, therefore, from any Christian 
man to trust or glory in himself, and not in the Lord, whose 
goodness towards us men is so great, that he vouchsafes to 
regard those things as our merits, which are His own gifts, 
Sess. vi. chap. 10. (s) For of ourselves, as of ourselves, we 
can do nothing ; but by His co-operation, who strengthens 
us, we can do all things : thus man hath not whereof to glory, 
but all our glory is in Christ, in whom we live, in whom we 
merit, in whom we make satisfaction, bringing forth fruits 
worthy of repentance, which have their efheacy from Him, 
arc offered unto the Father by Him, and are accepted by the 



DOCTRINE OF THE NEW CHURCH. 



5 



Father through Him, Sess. xiv. chap. 8. ('') Whosoever shall 
say that man may be justified in the sight of God by his own 
Works, which are done either through the powers of human 
nature, or through the teaching of the law, without divine 
grace through Christ Jesus, let him be accursed, Sess. vi. can. 
1. (') Whosoever shall say, that man may believe, hope, and 
love, (that is, have faith, hope, and charity,) as is necessary 
in order that the grace of justification may be conferred upon 
him, without the preventing inspiration of the Holy Spirit, 
and His assistance, let him be accursed, Sess. vi. can. 2. 
( k ) Whosoever shall say, that man is justified without the 
righteousness of Christ, whereby he hath merited for us, let 
him be accursed, Sess. vi. can. 10. Not to mention many 
more passages, principally relating to the conjunction of faith 
with charity or good works, and condemning their separa- 
tion. 

6. Concerning Free-will. ( a ) That free-will is by no means 
destroyed by Adam's sin, although it is debilitated and warped 
thereby, Sess. vi. chap. 1. ('■) Whosoever shall say, that the 
free-will of man, when moved and stirred up by God, cannot 
at all co-operate by concurring with God, who stirrcth it up 
and calleth it, whereby man may dispose and prepare him- 
self to receive the grace of justification ; or that he cannot 
dissent if he would, but that, like a thing inanimate, he is 
merely passive, and has not the least power of action, let him 
be accursed, Sess. vi. can. 4. 

7. The Doctrinals of the Roman Catholics concerning Jus- 
tification, as collected from the Decrees of the Council of 
Trent, men/ be summed up and arranged in a scries thus. 
That the sin of Adam is transfused into the whole human 
race, whereby his state, and likewise the state of all men, be- 
came perverted, and alienated from God, and thus they were 
made enemies and children of wrath; that therefore God the 
Father graciously sent His Son to reconcile, expiate, atone, 
satisfy, and thus to redeem, by being made righteousness. 
That Christ accomplished and fulfilled all this, by offering up 
Himself a sacrifice to God the Father upon the cross, and 
thus by his passion and blood. That Christ alone hath merit- 
ed, and that this His merit is graciously imputed, attributed, 
applied, and transferred, to the man who is recipient thereof, 
by God the Father through the Holy Spirit; and that thus 
the sin of Adam is removed from man ; concupiscence, how- 
ever, still remaining in him as an incentive to sin. That jus- 
tification is the remission of sins, and that from thence a 

1 * 



6 



A BRIEF EXPOSITION OF THE 



renovation of the interior man takes place, whereby man from 
an enemy becomes a friend, and from being a child of wrath, 
a child of grace ; and that thus union with Christ is effected, 
and the regenerate person becomes a living member of His 
body. 

8. That faith comes by hearing, when a man believes those 
things to be true which arc revealed from heaven, and trusts 
in the promises of God. That faitli is the beginning of man's 
salvation, the foundation and root of all justification, without 
which it is impossible to please God, and enter into the fel- 
lowship of His children ; that justification is brought about by 
faith, hope, and charity : and that, unless faith be accompa- 
nied by hope and charity, it is not living but dead, and inca- 
pable of effecting union with Christ. That it is man's duty 
to co-operate ; that he has the power to approach and recede, 
otherwise nothing could be given unto him, for he would be 
like an inanimate corpse. That, inasmuch as the reception of 
justification renevveth man, and as this is effected by the ap- 
plication of the merit of Christ, during man's co-operation, it 
follows that works arc meritorious ; but inasmuch as they are 
done from grace, and by the Holy Spirit, and as Christ alone 
hath merited, therefore God considers His own gifts in man 
as meritorious ; whence it follows, that no one ought to at- 
tribute any thing of merit to himself. 

The Doctrinals of the Protestants concerning Justi- 
fication, from the Formula Concordia. 

The book from whence the following extracts are collected, 
js called Formula Concordia, or Form of Concord, and was 
composed by persons attached to the Augsburg confession ; 
and as the pages will be cited where the quotations are to be 
met with, it is proper to observe, that I have made use of the 
edition printed at Leipsic in the year 1756. 

10. From the. Formula Concordia , concerning Original Sin. 
That since the fall of Adam, all men naturally descended 
from him arc born in sin, which brings damnation and eter- 
nal death upon those who are not regenerated, and that the 
merit of Christ is the only means whereby they are regenerat- 
ed, consequently the only remedy whereby they are restored, 
page 9, 10, 52, 53, 55, 317, 041, 644, and Appendix, p. 138, 
139. ('») That original sin is such a total corruption of nature, 
that there is no spiritual soundness in the powers of man either 
US to his soul or body, p. 574. ( c ) That it is the source of all 



DOCTRINE OF THE NEW CHURCH. 



7 



actual sins, p. 317, 577, 639, C40, 942, Appendix, p. 139. 
( d ) That it is a total absence or privation of the image of God, 
p. 040. ( e ) That we ought to distinguish between our nature, 
such as God created it, and original sin, which dwelleth in 
our nature, p. 04-5. (') Moreover original sin is there styled 
the work of the devil, spiritual poison, the root of all evils, an 
accident and a quality ; whereas our nature is there styled 
the work and creature of God, the personality of man, a sub-, 
stance and an essence ; and that the difference between them 
is the same as the difference between a man infected with a 
disease and the disease itself. 

11. Of Justification by Faith. The general principles 
are these : ( n ) That by the Word and sacraments the Holy 
Ghost is given, who effects faith when and where he pleases, 
in those who hear the gospel. ( b ) That contrition, justifica- 
tion by faith, renovation, and good works, follow in due order ; 
that they are to be properly distinguished one from the other ; 
and that contrition and good works do not avail any thing 
unto salvation, but faith alone. ( c ) That justification by faith 
alone is remission of sins, deliverance from damnation, recon- 
ciliation with the Father, adoption as sons, and is effected 
by the imputation of the merit or righteousness of Christ. 
( d ) That hence Faith is that essential righteousness, whereby 
we are accounted righteous before God, and that it is a trust 
and confidence in grace. ( e ) That renovation, which follows, 
is vivification, regeneration, and sanctification. ( l ) That good 
works, which are the fruits of faith, being in themselves works 
of the spirit, follow that renovation. (") That this faith may 
be lost by grievous sins. The general principli s concerning 
the Law and the Gospel are these : ( fl ) That we must careful- 
ly distinguish between the law and the gospel, and between 
the works of the law and the works of the spirit, which are 
the fruits of faith. (') That the law is a doctrine which teaches 
that man is in sin, and therefore under condemnation and the 
wrath of God, thus exciting terror ; but that the gospel is a 
doctrine which teaches atonement for sin, and deliverance 
from damnation by Christ, and thus a doctrine of consolation. 
( k ) That there are three uses of the law, viz. to keep the 
wicked within bounds, to bring men to an acknowledgment 
of their sins, and to hold up to the regenerate a rule of life. 
(') That the regenerate are in the law, but not under the law, 
for they are under grace. (»») That it is the duty of the re- 
generate to exercise themselves in the law, because, during 
their life in the world, they arc prompted to sin by the lusts 



s 



A BRIEF EXPOSITION OF THE 



of the flesh ; but that they become pure and perfect after 
death. (") That the regenerate are also chastised by the 
Holy Ghost, and endure various afflictions, but that neverthe- 
less they keep the law willingly, and thus, being the children 
of God, live in obedience to the law. (°) That with those 
who are not regenerated the veil of Moses still remaineth be- 
fore their eyes, and the old Adam beareth rule ; but that with 
the regenerate, the veil of Moses is taken away, and the old 
Adam brought into subjection, or crucified. 

12. Particulars from the Formula Concordia;, concerning 
Justification by Faith without the Works of the Law. 
( a ) That faith is imputed for righteousness without works, on 
account of the merit of Christ which is laid hold of by faith, 
p. 78, 79, 80, 584, 689. ( b ) That charity follows justifying 
faith, but that faith does not justify as being formed by chari- 
ty, as the Papists say, p. 81, 89, 94, 117, 688, 691, Appen- 
dix, p. 169. ( c ) That neither the contrition which precedes 
faith, nor the renovation and sanctification which follow 
after it, nor the good works then performed, have any thing to 
do with justification by faith, p. 688, 689. ( d ) That it is a 
folly to imagine, that the works of the second table of the 
decalogue justify in the sight of God, for that table has rela- 
tion to our transactions with men, and not properly with God ; 
and the business of justification is between God and us, and 
to appease His wrath, p. 102. ( e ) If anyone therefore believes 
he can obtain the remission of his sins, because he is possessed 
of charity, he brings a reproach on Christ, by an impious and 
vain confidence in his own righteousness, p. 87, 89. (') That 
good works are utterly to be excluded, in treating of justifica- 
tion and eternal life, p. 589. (") That good works are not 
necessary as a meritorious cause of salvation, and that they 
do not enter into the act of justification, p. 589, 590, 702, 
704, Appendix, p. 173. ('■) That the position, that good 
works are necessary to salvation, is to be rejected, because il 
takes away the comfort of the gospel, gives occasion to doubt 
of the grace of God, instils a conceit of sclf-righteousness, and 
because they are admitted by the Papists to support a bad 
cause, p. 704. (') The expression, that good works are neces- 
sary to salvation, is rejected and condemned, p. 591. ( k ) Th;it. 
expressions, implying that good works are necessary unto sal- 
vation, ought not to be taught and defended, but rather ex- 
ploded and rejected by the churches as false, p. 705. (') That 
works, which do not proceed from a true faith, are, in fact, 
sins in the sight of God, that is to say, they are defiled with 



DOCTRINE OF THE NEW CHURCH. 



9 



sin, because a corrupt tree cannot bring forth good fruit, p. 
700. ('") That faith and salvation are neither preserved nor 
retained by good works, because these are only evidences that 
the Holy Spirit is present, and dwelleth in us, p. 590, 705, 
Appendix, p. 174. (") That the Decree of the Council of 
Trent is deservedly to be rejected, which affirms, that good 
works preserve salvation, or that justification by faith, or even 
faith itself, is maintained and preserved, either in the whole, 
or in the least part, by our works, p. 707. 

13. Particulars from the Formula Concordia', concerning 
the Fruits of Faith. ( a ) That a difference is to be observed 
between the works of the law and the works of the spirit ; 
and that the works which a regenerate person performs with 
a free and willing mind, are not works of the law, but works 
of the spirit, which are the fruits of faith ; because they who 
are born again are not under the law, bat under grace, p. 5S9, 
593, 721, 722. ( b ) That good works are the fruits of repent- 
ance, p. 12. ( c ) That the regenerate receive by faith a new 
life, new affections, and new works, and that these are from 
faith in repentance, p. 134. That man after conversion 
and justification begins to be renewed in his mind, and at 
length in his understanding, and that then his will is not in- 
active or backward in performing daily exercises of repentance, 
p. 582, 073, 700. ( e ) That we ought to repent as well on 
account of original sin, as on account of actual sins, p. 321, 
Appendix, p. 159. (') That repentance with Christians con- 
tinues until death, because they have to wrestle with the re- 
mains of sin in the flesh as long as they live, p. 327. (=) That we 
must enter upon, and advance more and more in, the practice of 
the law of the decalogue, p. 85, 80. ('') That the regenerate, 
although delivered from the curse of the law, ought neverthe- 
less still to exercise themselves in the divine law, p. 718. 
(') That the regenerate are not without the law, though not 
under the law, for they live according to the law of the Lord, 
p. 722. ( k ) That the law ought to be considered by the re- 
generate as a rule of religious life, p. 596, 717, Appendix, p. 
150. (') That the regenerate do good works, not by constraint, 
but of their own accord and freely, as though they had re- 
ceived no command, had heard of no threatenings, and expect- 
ed no reward, p. 590, 701. ( m ) That with them faith is always 
occupied in some good work, and he who does not thus per- 
form good works, is destitute of true faith, for where there is 
faith, there will be also good works, p. 701. (") That charity 
and good fruits follow faith and regeneration, p. 121 , 122, 



10 



A BRIEF EXPOSITION OF THE 



171, 183, 092. (°) Faith and works agree well together, and 
are inseparably connected ; but faith alone lays hold of the 
blessing without works, and yet it is not alone ; hence it is 
that faith without works is dead, p. 692, (393. (p) That after 
man is justified by faith, his faith, being then true and alive, is 
operative by charity, for good works always follow justifying 
faith, and are most certainly discovered with it ; thus faith is 
never alone, but always accompanied by hope and charity, 
p. 530. (i) We allow, that where good works do not follow 
faith, in such case it is a false and not a true faith, p. 330. 
( r ) That it is as impossible to separate good works from faith, 
as heat and light from fire, p. 701. ( s ) That as the old Adam 
is always inherent in our very nature, the regenerate have 
continual need of admonition, doctrine, threatcnings, and 
even the chastisements of the law, for they are reproved and 
corrected by the Holy Spirit through the law, p. 719, 720, 
721. ( l ) That the regenerate must wrestle with the old 
Adam, and that the flesh must be kept under by exhortations, 
threatenings, and stripes, because renovation of life by faith 
is only begun in the present life, p. 595, 590, 724. (") That 
there remains a perpetual wrestling between the flesh and the 
spirit, in the elect and truly regenerate, p. 675, 07 9. (*) That 
the reason why Christ promises remission of sins to good 
works, is, because they follow reconciliation, and also because 
good fruits must necessarily follow, and because they are the 
signs of the promise, p. 110, 117. (>') That saving faith is 
not in those who have not charity, for charity is the fruit which 
infallibly and necessarily follows true faith, p. 088. ( z ) That 
good works are necessary on many accounts, but not as a 
meritorious cause, p. 11, 17, 04, 95, 133, 589,590,702, 
Appendix, p. 172. ( aa ) That a regenerate person ought to 
co-operate with the Holy Spirit, by the new gifts and powers 
which he hath received, but in a certain way, p. 582, 583, 
074,075, Appendix, p. 144. ( Uh ) In the Confession of the 
Churches in the Low Countries, which u'as received in the 
Synod of Dart, we rend as follows : " Holy faith cannot be 
inactive in man, for it is a faith working by charity ; and 
works, which proceed from a good root of faith, are good and 
acceptable in the sight of God, as being fruits of a good tree; 
for we are debtors unto God to do good works, but God is no 
debtor unto us, inasmuch as it is God that doeth them in 
us." 

14. Concerning Merits, from the Formula Concordia;. 
(•') That it is false, that our works merit remission of sins ; 



DOCTRINE OF THE NEW CHURCH. 



11 



false, that men are accounted righteous by the righteousness 
of reason ; and false, that reason, of its ow n strength, is capa- 
ble of loving God above all things, and of keeping His law, 
p. 64. ( b ) That faith does not justify because it is in itself 
so good a work, and so excellent a virtue, but because it lays 
hold of the merit of Christ in the promise of the gospel, p. 
70, 634. ( c ) That the promise of remission of sins, and justi- 
fication for Christ's sake, docs not involve any condition of 
merit, because it is freely offered, p. 67. That a sinner is 
justified in the sight of God, or absolved from his sins, and 
from the most just sentence of damnation, and adopted into 
the number of the children of God, without any merit of his 
own, and without any works of his own, whether past, present, 
or future, of mere grace, and only on account of the sole 
merit of Christ, which is imputed to him for righteousness, 
p. 6S4. ( e ) That good works follow faith, remission of sins, 
and regeneration ; and whatever of pollution or imperfection 
is in them is not accounted sinful or defective, and that for 
Christ's sake ; and thus that the whole man, both as to his 
person and his works, is rendered and pronounced righteous 
and holy, out of mere grace and mercy in Christ, shed abroad, 
displayed, and magnified towards us ; wherefore we cannot 
glory on account of merit, p. 74, 9~, 93, 336. (') He who 
trusts in works, thinking he can merit any thing thereby, 
despises the merit and grace of Christ, and seeks a way to 
heaven without Christ, by his own strength, p. 16, 17, 18, 19. 
(") Whosoever desires to ascribe something to good works in 
the article of justification, and to merit the grace of God there- 
by, to such a man works are not only unprofitable, but even 
pernicious, p. 70S. ( h ) The works of the decalogue arc enu- 
merated, and other necessary works, which God vouchsafes 
to reward, p. 170, 198. (') We teach, that good works are 
meritorious, not indeed of remission of sins, grace, and justifi- 
cation, but of other temporal rewards, and even spiritual re- 
wards in this Life, and after this life, because Paul says, 
" Every one shall receive a reward according to his labour;" 
and Christ says, "Great will be your reward in heaven;" and 
it is frequently said, that " it shall be rendered unto every one 
according to his works ;" wherefore we acknowledge eternal 
life to be a reward, because it is our due according to promise, 
2i\.\ because God crowns His own gifts, but not on account 
of our merits, p. 96, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138. ( k ) That 
the good work:; of believers, when they are performed upon 
right principles, and directed to right ends, such as God re- 



12 



A BRIEF EXPOSITION OF THE 



quires from the regenerate, are signs of eternal salvation ; and 
that God the Father accounts them acceptable and pleasing 
for Christ's sake, and promises to them excellent rewards 
of the present life, and of that which is to come, p. 708. 
(') That although good works merit rewards, yet neither from 
their worthiness nor fitness do they merit the remission of 
sins, or the glory of eternal life, p. 90, 135, 139, &c. Appen- 
dix, p. 174. ("') That Christ at the last judgment will pass 
sentence on good and evil works, as the genuine effects and 
evidences of men's faith, p. 134, Appendix, p. 187. (") That 
God rewards good works, but that it is of grace that He 
crowns His own gifts, is asserted in the Confession of the 
Churches in the Low Countries. 

15. Concerning Free-will, from the Formula Concordia: 
( a ) That man hath not the smallest degree of ability in spiritu- 
al things, p. 15, 18,219, 318, 579, G5G,&c. Appendix, p. 141. 
('*) That man, by the fall of his first parents, is become so 
totally corrupt, that he is by nature blind with respect to 
spiritual things, which relate to conversion and salvation, and 
accounts the Word of God as a foolish thing ; and that he is, 
and continues to be, an enemy to God, until, by the power of 
the Holy Spirit, through preaching and hearing of tiie Word, 
he is, of mere grace, without any the least co-operation on his 
part, converted, gifted with faith, regenerated, and renewed, 
p. 050, G57. ( c ) That man is altogether corrupt and dead to 
what is good, so that in the nature of man, since the fall, 
and before regeneration, there is not so much as a spark 
of spiritual strength subsisting or remaining, whereby he can 
prepare himself for the grace of God, or apprehend it when 
offered, or, of and by himself, be capable of receiving it, or 
understand, believe, embrace, think, will, begin, perfect, act, 
operate, co-opernte in spiritual things, or apply or accommodate 
himself to grace, or contribute any thing towards his conver- 
sion, either in ti c whole; the half, or the least part, p. 650, 
G58. That man, in spiritual and divine things, which re- 
gard salvation, is like the pillar of salt into which Lot's wife 
was turned, and like a stock or a stone without life, which 
have neither the use of eyes, mouth, nor any of the senses, p. 
661, 002. ( e ) That still man hath a loco-motive power, by 
virtue whereof he can govern his outward members, attend 
public worship, and hear the Word and the gospel ; but that 
in his private thoughts he despises it as a foolish thing ; and 
in this respect is worse than a stock, unless the Holy Spirit is 
efficacious in him, p. GG2, G71, G72, G73. ( f ) That still it is 



DOCTRINE OF THE NEW CHURCH. 



13 



not with man in his conversion, as in the forming of a stone 
into a statue, or the stamping an impression upon wax, which 
have neither know ledge, sense, nor will, p. 662, 681. ( g ) That 
man in his conversion is a merely passive subject, and not an 
active one, p. 662, GS1. ('•) That man in his conversion does 
not at all co-operate with the Holy Spirit, p. 219, 5/9, 583, 
672, 6T6, Appendix, p. 143, 144. ( h ) That man since the 
full retains and possesses the faculty of knowing natural things, 
as also free-will in some measure to choose natural and civil 
good, p. 14, 218, 641, 064, Appendix 142. (') That the as- 
sertions of certain fathers, and modern doctors, that God 
draws man, but draws him in a manner consistent with his 
will, are not consonant with Holy Scripture, p. 5S2, 583. 
( k ) That man, when he is born again by the power of the 
Holy Spirit, co-operates, though in much weakness, from the 
new powers and gifts, which the Holy Spirit has begun to 
operate in him at his conversion, not indeed forcibly, but 
spontaneously, p. 582, &c. 673, 674, 675, Appendix, p. 144. 
(') That in the regenerate, not only the gifts of God, but 
likewise Christ Himself dwclleth by faith, as in His temples, 
p. 695, 697, 698, Appendix, p. 130. ( m ) There is a wide dif- 
ference between baptized persons and persons not baptized ; 
for it is the doctrine of Paul, that all who have been baptized, 
have put on Christ, and are truly regenerate, having thereby 
acquired a freedom of will, that is to say, being again made 
free, as Christ testifies, whence they not only hear the Word 
of God, but are likewise enabled, though in much weakness, 
to assent to, and embrace it by faith, p. 675. 

It is proper to observe, that the foregoing extracts are taken 
from a book called Formula Concordia, which was composed 
by persons attached to the Augsburg confession ; but that 
nevertheless the like doctrines concerning justification by faith 
alone are maintained and taught by the Reformed in England 
and Holland ; wherefore the following treatise is intended 
for all ; see below, n. 17, 18. 



A 

SKETCH 

OF THE 

DOCTRINALS OF THE NEW CHURCH. 



16. We now proceed to give a brief Exposition of the Doctrine 
of the New Church, which is signified by the New Jerusalem 
in the Revelation, chap. xxi. and xxii. This doctrine, which 
is not only a doctrine of faith, but also of life, will be divided 
in the larger work into three parts.* 

The FmsT Part will treat, I. Of the Lord God the Saviour, 
and of the Divine Trinity in Him. II. Of the Sacred Scrip- 
ture, and its Two Senses, the Natural and the Spiritual, and 
of its sanctity thence derived. III. Of Love to God and Love 
toicards our Neighbour, and of the Agreement of those Loves 
with each other. IV. Of Faith, and its Conjunction with 
those two Loves. V. The Doctrine of Life from the Command- 
ments of the Decalogue. VI. Of Reformation and Regenera- 
tion. VII. Of Free-will, and Man's Co-operation with the 
Lord thereby. VIII. Of Baptism. IX. Of the Holy Sup- 
per, X. Of Heaven and Hell. XI. Of Man's Conjunction 
therewith, and of the State of Man's Life after Death accord- 
ing to that Conjunction. XII. Of Eternal Life. 

The Second Part will treat, I. Of the Consummation of 
the Age, or End of the present Church. II. Of the Coming 
of the Lord. III. Of the Last Judgment. IV. Of the New 
Church, which is the New Jerusalem. 



#The work here alluded to is the True Christian Religion, which was pub- 
lished about three years after the appearance of this Sietcli. In composing this 
great work, the author has adhered to the plan here laid down as to substance, 
but not exactly as to form : thus he has not divided it into three parts, but into 
fourteen chapters, in which he treats expressly of most of the subjects here men- 
tioned as designed to form the contents of two parts of the work, and incidentally 
of the others ; but the disagreements betweent he tenets of the Old Church and of 
the New, which are here mentioned as the subject of a separate third part, are 
not treated of by themselves, but are pointed out throughout the whole course of 
the work, as occasion requires. 



DOCTRINE OF THE NEW CHURCH. 



15 



The Third Part will point out the Disagreements bcticeen 
the Tenets of the present Church, find those of the New 
Church. But we will dwell a little upon these now, because 
it is believed both by the clergy and laity, that the present 
church is in the genuine light of the gospel and in the truths 
thereof, which cannot possibly be disproved, overturned, or 
controverted, not even by an angel from heaven ; neither does 
the present church see any otherwise, because it has with- 
drawn the understanding from faith, and yet has confirmed 
its tenets by a kind of sight beneath the understanding, for 
falses may there be confirmed to such a degree, as to put on 
the appearance of truths: and when this is the case, they ac- 
quire a fallacious light, before which the light of truth appears 
as darkness. For this reason we shall here dwell a little upon 
this subject, mentioning the disagreements, and illustrating 
them by brief remarks, that such as have not their under- 
standings closed by a blind faith may see them at first as in 
a kind of twilight, and afterwards as in morning light, and at 
length, in the large work, as in the light of day. The disa- 
greements in general are as follows : 

L 

17. That the Churches, which by the Reformation sepa- 
rated themselves from the Roman Catholic Church, dissent in 
various points of doctrine ; but that they all agree in the 
articles concerning a Trinity of Persons in the Godhead, 
Original Sin from Adam, Imputation of the Merit of Christ, 
and Justif cation by Faith alone. 

brief analysis of the above proposition. 

18. The churches, which by the reformation separated 
themselves from the Romish church, are composed of such as 
call themselves Gospellers and Reformed, likewise Protestants, 
or, from the names of their leaders, Lutherans and Calvinists, 
among which the church of England holds the middle place : 
we shall say nothing here of the Greek church, which long 
ago separated from the church of Rome. That the Protestant 
churches dissent in various things, particularly concerning 
the holy supper, baptism, election, and the person of Christ, 
is well known to many : but that they all agree in the articles 
of a trinity of persons in the Godhead, original sin, imputation 
of the merit of Christ, and justification by faith alone, is not 



16 



A BRIEF EXPOSITION OF THE 



universally known ; the reason of which is, because ft w per- 
sons apply themselves to inquire into the differences of senti- 
ment maintained by different churches, and consequently few 
understand wherein they agree : it is oidy the clergy that 
study the tenets of their church, while the laity rarely enter 
deeply into them, and consequently are unacquainted with 
differences in opinion. That nevertheless they agree in the 
four articles above-mentioned, both in their general principles, 
and in many of the particulars, will appear evident to any 
one who will be at the pains to consult their books, or attend 
to their sermons. This, however, it is necessary to make the 
reader acquainted with, on account of what follows. 

II. 

19. That the Roman Catholics, before the Reformation, 
held and taught exactly the same things as the Reformed 
did after it, in respect to the four articles above-mentioned, 
namely, a Trinity of Persons in the Godhead, Original Sin, 
the Imputation of the Merit of Christ, and Justification by 
Faith therein, only with this difference, that they conjoined 
that Faith with Charity or Good Works. 

BRIEF ANALYSTS. 

20. That there is such a conformity between the Roman 
Catholics and the Protestants in these four articles, as hardly 
to be any material difference, except that the former conjoin 
faith and charity, while the latter divide between them, is 
scarcely known to any one, and indeed is so generally un- 
known, that the learned themselves will be ready to wonder 
at the assertion : the reason of this ignorance is, because the 
Roman Catholics rarely approach God our Saviour, but instead 
of Him the pope as His vicar, and likewise the saints; hence 
they have deeply buried in oblivion their tenets concerning 
the imputation of the merit of Christ, and justification by 
faith ; that nevertheless such tenets are received and acknowl- 
edged by them, evidently appears from the Decrees of the 
Council of Trent, quoted above, n. 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and con- 
firmed by pope Pius IV. n. 2 : which if compared with the 
tenets extracted from the Augsburg Confession, and from the 
Formula Concordia? thence derived, n. 9, 10, 11, 12, the dif- 
ference between them will be found to consist more in words 
than in substance. The doctors of the church, by reading 



DOCTRINE OF THE NEW CHURCH. 



17 



and comparing the above passages together, may indeed see 
some conformity between them, but still rather obscurely; 
that these therefore, as well as those who are less learned, and 
also the laity, may be fully satisfied in this matter, the subject 
shall be more clearly illustrated in what follows. 

III. 

21. That the leading Reformers, Luther, Melanethon, and 
Calvin, retained all the tenets concerning a Trinity of Per- 
sons in the Godhead, Original Sin, Imputation of the Merits 
of Christ, and Justification by Faith, just as tlicy were and 
had been among the Roman Catholics ; but that they separat- 
ed Charity or Good Works from that faith, and declared that 
they mere not at the same time of a saving efficacy, ivith a 
view to be totally severed from the Roman Catholics as to the 
very Essentials of the Church, which arc Faith and Charity. 

BRIEF ANALYSIS. 

22. That the four articles above mentioned, as at present 
taught in the reformed churches, were not new, and first 
broached by those three leaders, but were handed down from 
the time of the council of Nice, and taught by the writers 
after that period, and thus preserved in the Romish church, 
is very plain from ecclesiastical history. The reason why 
the Roman Catholics and the Reformed agree in the article 
of a trinity of persons in the Godhead, is, because they both 
acknowledge the three creeds, the Apostles', the Nicene, and 
the Athanasian, in which a trinity is taught. That they 
agree in the article of the imputation of the merit of Christ, 
is plain from the extracts from the council of Trent, n. 3 to 8, 
compared with those from the Formula Concordia;, n. 10 to 
15. Their agreement in the article of justification, shall now 
be the subject of discussion. 

23. The doctrine maintained by the council of Trent, con- 
cerning justifying faith, is as follows : " It has always been 
the uniform opinion of the Catholic church, that faith is the 
beginning of man's salvation, the foundation and root of all 
justification, without which it is impossible to please God, and 
attain to the fellowship of His children," see above, n. 5 ( a ). 
Also, " that faith comes by hearing the word of God," n. 4 ( c ). 
Moreover, that that Romish council conjoined faith and chari- 
ty, or faith and good works, may clearly be seen from the 



18 



A BRIEF EXPOSITION OF THE 



quotations above, n. 4, 5, 7, 8. But that the reformed 
churches, from their leaders, have separated them, declaring 
salvation to consist in faith, and not at the same time in 
charity or works, to the intent that they might be totally 
severed from the Roman Catholics, as to the very essentials 
of the church, which are faith and charity, I have frequently 
heard from the above-mentioned leaders themselves ; as also, 
that they established such separation by the following con- 
siderations, viz. : that no one can do any good thing available 
to salvation, of himself, nor can fulfill the law ; and moreover, 
[that good works should be excluded] lest thereby any merit 
of man should enter into faith. That from these principles, 
and with this view, they excluded the good works of charity 
from faith, and thereby also from salvation, is plain from the 
quotations from the Formula Concordia? above, n. 12 ; among 
which are these : " That faith docs not justify, as being formed 
by charity, as the Papists alledgc, n. 12 ( b ) : that the position, 
that good works are necessary to salvation, ought to be re- 
jected upon many accounts, and among others, because they 
are accepted by the Papists to support a bad cause, n. 12 ( h ) : 
that the decree of the council of Trent, that good works pre- 
serve and retain salvation and faith, is deservedly to be re- 
jected," n. 12 (") : not to mention other passages to the same 
purport. That still, however, the Reformed conjoin faith and 
charity into one essential of salvation, and only differ from 
the Roman Catholics respecting the quality of works, will 
be shown in the following article. 

IV. 

24. That nevertheless the hading Reformers adjoined good 
works, and even conjoined them to their faith, but in man as a 
passive subject; whereas the Roman Catholics conjoin them in 
man as an active subject ; and that notwithstanding there is 
actually a conformity between the one and the other as to faith, 
works, and merits. 

BRIEF ANALYSIS. 

25. That the leading Reformers, although they separated 
faith and charity, did still adjoin and even conjoin them, but 
would not admit of their being united into one, so as to be 
both together necessary to salvation, is evident from their 
books, sermons, and declarations ; for after they have separat- 



DOCTRINE OF THE NEW CHURCH. 



19 



ed them, they conjoin them, and even express this conjunc- 
tion in clear terms, and not in such as admit of two senses ; 
as for instance in the following : That faith after justification 
is never alone, but is always accompanied by charity or good 
works, and if not, that such faith is not a living but a dead 
faith, see above, n. 13, (°) (p) (<i) (') (>') ( b ") : nay, that good 
works necessarily follow faith, n. 13, ( x ) (>') ( z ) : and that the 
regenerate person, by new powers and gifts, co-operates with 
the Holy Spirit, n. 13 ( aa ). That the Roman Catholics teach 
exactly the same doctrines, is plain from the passages col- 
lected from the council of Trent, n. 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. 

26. That the Reformers profess nearly the same things 
with the Roman Catholics concerning the merit of works, 
is evident from the following quotations from the Formula 
Concordia; : That good works are rewarded by virtue of the 
promise and by grace, and that from thence they merit rewards 
botli temporal and spiritual, n. 14, (') ( k ) (') (") : and that 
God crowns His own gifts with a reward, n. 14, ( k ) ("). The 
like is asserted in the council of Trent, namely, That God 
of His grace makes His own gifts to be merits, n. 5, ( f ) : and 
moreover, that salvation is not of works, but of promise and 
grace, because it is God who operates them by His Holy 
Spirit, n. 5, («) (<) (6) (») C) («). 

27. From comparing the one and the other, it appears, at 
the first view, as though there was an entire conformity be- 
tween them ; but lest this should be the case, the Reformers 
distinguished between the works of the law proceeding from 
man's purpose and will, and works of the spirit proceeding 
from faith as from a free and spontaneous source, which latter 
they denominated the fruits of faith, as may be seen above, 
n. 11, (>') ('), and n. 13, ( ■) (') ('), and n. 15, ( k ). Hence, on 
an accurate examination and comparison, there does not ap- 
pear to be any difference in the works themselves, but only 
in the quality of them, viz. that the latter sort proceed from 
man as from a passive subject, but the former as from an ac- 
tive subject; consequently they are spontaneous when they 
proceed from man's understanding, and not at the same time 
from his will ; this is said, because man, while he does good 
works^ cannot but be conscious that he is doing them, and 
consciousness is from the understanding. Nevertheless, as 
the Reformed likewise preach up the exercises of repentance, 
and wrestlings with the flesh, n. 13, ( e ) (<) (s) ( h ) ( k ), and 
these cannot be done by man but from his purpose and will, 



20 



A BRIEF EXPOSITION OF THE 



and thus by him as from himself, it follows, that there is still 
an actual conformity. 

28. As to what concerns free-will in conversion, or in the 
act of justification, it appears as if their sentiments were en- 
tirely opposite to each other ; but that they still accord to- 
gether, may be seen, if we duly consider and compare the 
passages transcribed from the council of Trent, n. 6, ( a ) ( b ), 
with those from the Formula Concordia, n. 15, ("') : for in 
Christian countries all are baptized, and from thence are in 
a state of free-will, so as to be enabled not only to hear the 
Word of God, but likewise to assent to the same, and em- 
brace it by faith ; consequently no one in the Christian world 
is like a stock. 

29. Hence, then, appears the truth of what is asserted in 
n. 19 and n. 21, viz. that the Reformers derived their opin- 
ions, concerning a trinity of persons in the Godhead, origin- 
al sin, the imputation of the merit of Christ, and justifica- 
tion by faith, from the Roman Catholics. These things 
have been advanced in order to point out the origin of their 
tenets, especially the origin of the separation of faith from 
good works, or the doctrine of faith alone, and to show that 
it was with no other view than to be severed from the Roman 
Catholics, and that, after all, their disagreement is more in 
words than in reality. From the passages above adduced, 
it very evidently appears upon what foundation the faith of 
the reformed churches has been erected, and from what in- 
spiration it took its rise. 

V. 

30. That the whole system of Theology in the Christian 
World, at this day, is founded on an idea of Three Gods, 
arising from the Doctrine of a Trinity of Persons. 

BRIEF ANALYSIS. 

31. We will first say something concerning the origin, or 
source, from whence the idea of a trinity of persons in the 
Godhead, and thereby of three Gods, proceeded. There are 
three creeds, entitled, the Apostles', the Nicene, and the 
Athanasian, which specifically assert a trinity : the Apostles' 
and the Nicene assert simply a trinity, but the Athanasian a 
trinity of persons. These three Creeds are to be met with in 
many of our Psalters, the Apostles' Creed next the Psalm 



DOCTIUNE OF THE NEW CHURCH. 



21 



which is sung, the Niccne after the Decalogue, and the Atha- 
nasian apart by itself.* The Apostles' Creed was written 
after the times of the Apostles ; the Nicene Creed at the 
Council of Nice, a city ofBithynia, whereunto all the bishops 
in Asia, Africa, and Europe, were summoned by the Empe- 
ror Constantine, in the year 318 ; but the Athanasian Creed 
was composed since that council by one or more persons, with 
an intent utterly to overthrow the Arians, and was afterwards 
received by the churches as oecumenical. In the two former 
creeds the confession of a trinity was evident, but, from the 
third, or Athanasian Creed, the profession of a trinity of per- 
sons was spread abroad : that hence arose an idea of three 
Gods, shall now be shown. 

32. That there is a divine trinity, is manifest from the 
Lord's words in Matthew : " Jesus said, go, make disciples of 
all nations, baptizing them in the name of the father, of the 
Son, and o f the Holy Sj)irit," chap, xxviii. 19, and from these 
Words, in the same Evangelist : " When Jesus was baptized, 
lo, the heavens were opened unto Him, and He saw the Holy 
Spirit descending like a dove, and coming upon Him, and lo, 
a voice from heaven, this is My beloved Son, in whom I am well 
pleased," chap. iii. 16, 17. The reason why the Lord sent 
His disciples to baptize in the name of the Father, Son, and 
Holy Spirit, was, because in Him then glorified there was a 
divine trinity ; for, in the preceding verse, 18, He saith, "All 
jwwer is given unto Me in heaven and in earth ;" and, in the 
20th verse following, " Lo, I am with you all the days, even 
unto the consummation of the age ;" thus He spoke of Himself 
alone, and not of three ; and, in John : " The Holy Spirit 
was not yet, because Jesus was not yit glorified,''' chap. vii. 39 : 
the former words He uttered after His glorification, and His 
glorification was His complete unition with His Father, who 
was the Essential Divine [Principle] in Him from conception; 
and the Holy Spirit was the Divine [Principle] proceeding 
from Him after His glorification, John, xx. 22. 

33. The reason why the idea of three Gods has principally 
arisen from the Athanasian Creed, where a trinity of persons 
is taught, is because the word person begets such an idea, 
which is further implanted in the mind by the following words 



"This relates to the Protestant churches on the continent j the three creeds are 
also given in the Liturgy or Hook of Common Prayer of the church of England, 
the Apostles' next after the Psalm that is said or sung after the second lesson, the 
Nicene in the communion service, and the Athanasian by itself, after the evening 
prayer, 



23 



A BRIEF EXPOSITION OF THE 



in the same Creed : " There is one person of the Father, anoth- 
er of tlic Son, and another of the Holy Ghost ;" and, after- 
wards : " The Father is God and Lord, the Son is God mid 
Lord, and the Holy Ghost is God and Lord;" but more es- 
pecially by these ; "For like as we are compelled by the Chris- 
tian verity to acknowledge every person by Himself to be God 
and Lord, so are we forbidden by the Catholic religion to sat/ 
tin re be three Gods or three Lords ;" the result of which words 
is this, that by the Christian verity we are bound to confess 
and acknowledge three Gods and three Lords, but, by the 
Catholic religion, we are not allowed to say or to make mention 
of three Gods and Lords ; consequently we njay have an 
idea of three Gods and Lords, but are not to make confession 
thereof with our mouth. Nevertheless, that the doctrine of 
the trinity in the Athanasian Creed is agreeable to truth, if 
only instead of a trinity of persons be there substituted a trin- 
ity of person, which trinity is in God the Saviour Jesus Christ, 
may be seen in the Doctrine of the Nao Jerusalem concerning 
the Lord, published at Amsterdam, in the year 1763, n. 55 
to 61. 

34. It is to be observed, that in the Apostles' Creed it is 
said, "I believe in God the Father, in Jesi/s Christ, and in the 
Holy Ghost ;" in the Nicene Creed, " / believe in one God, 
the Father, in one Lord Jesus Christ, and in the Holy Ghost," 
thus only in one God ; but in the Athanasian Creed it is, 
"In God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Ghost," 
thus in three Gods. But whereas the authors and favourers 
of this creed clearly saw that an idea of three Gods would 
unavoidably result from the expressions therein used, there- 
fore, in order to remedy this, they asserted that one substance 
or essence belongs to the three ; but still there arises from 
thence no other idea than that there are three Gods unani- 
mous and agreeing together : for when it is said of the three 
that their substance or essence is one and indivisible, it does 
not remove the idea of three, but confounds it, because the 
expression is a metaphysical one, and the science of meta- 
physics, with all its ingenuity, cannot of three persons, each 
whereof is God, make one ; it may indeed make of them one 
in the confession of the mouth, but never in the idea of the 
mind. 

35. That the whole system of Christian theology at this 
day is founded on an idea of three Gods, is evident from the 
doctrine of justification, which is the head of the doctrinals 
of the Christian church, both among Roman Catholics and 



DOCTRINE OF THE NEW CHURCH. 



23 



Protestants. That doctrine sets forth, that God the Father 
sent His Son to redeem and save mankind, and gives the 
Holy Spirit to operate the same : every man who hears, reads, 
or repeats this, cannot hut in his thought, that is, in his idea, 
divide God into three, and suppose that one God sent another, 
and operates by a third. That the same thought of a divine 
trinity distinguished into three persons, each whereof is God, 
is continued throughout the rest of the doctrinals of the pres- 
ent church, as from a head into its body, will be demonstrated 
in its proper place. In the mean time consult what has been 
premised concerning justification, consult the system of the- 
ology in general and in particular, and at the same time con- 
sult yourself, while listening to sermons at church, or while 
praying at home, whether you have any other perception and 
thought thence resulting, than of three Gods ; and especially 
while you are praying or singing first to one, and then to the 
other two separately, as is the common practice. Hence is 
confirmed the truth of the proposition, that the whole system 
of theology in the Christian world, at this day, is founded upon 
an idea of three Gods. 

36. That a trinity of Gods is contrary to Holy Scripture, is 
well known, for it is written, " Am not I Jehovah ? and there 
is no God else In side Me, a just God and a Saviour, there is 
Horn- beside Me," Isa. xlv. "21, 22. " / Jehovah am thy God, 
and thou shult acknowledge no God beside Me, and there is no 
Saviour beside Me," Hos. xiii. 4. " Thus said Jehovah the 
King of Israel and the Redeemer thereof, Jehovah Zebaoth, 
I am t!ii i First and the Last, and beside Me there is no God," 
Isa. xliv. G. " Jehovah Zebaoth is His name, and thy Re- 
deemer the Holy One of Israel, the God of the whole earth 
shall He be called," Isa. liv. 5. " ///. that day Jehovah shall 
be King over the whole earth, in that day there shall be One 
Jehovah, and His name One," Zech. xiv. 9. Beside many 
more passages elsewhere. 

37. That a trinity of Gods is contrary to enlightened 
reason, may appear from many considerations. What man 
of sound reason can bear to hear, that three Gods created 
the world ; or that creation and preservation, redemption and 
salvation, together with reformation and regeneration, are 
the work of three Gods, and not of one God ? And, on the 
other hand, what man of sound reason is not willing to hear, 
(hat the same God, who is our Creator, is also our Redeemer, 
Regenerator, and Saviour ? As the latter sentiment, and 
not the former, accords with reason, there is therefore no na- 



24 



A BRIEF EXPOSITION OF THE 



tion upon the face of the whole earth, possessed of religion 
and sound reason, but what acknowledges one God. That 
the Mahometans, and certain nations in Asia and Africa, 
abhor Christianity, because they believe it inculcates the 
worship of three Gods, is well known ; and the only answer 
of the Christians to the charge is, that the three possess one 
essence, and thus arc one God. I can affirm, that from the 
reason which has been given me, I can clearly see, that 
neither the world, nor the angelic heaven, nor the church, 
nor any thing therein, could have existed, or can still subsist, 
but from one God. 

38. Here I will add a quotation from the Confession of the 
Dutch Churches received at the Synod of Dort, which is this : 
"I believe in one God, who is one essence, in which are 
three Persons, truly and really distinct, in communicable 
properties from eternity, namely, the Father, the Son, and 
the Holy Spirit ; the Father is of all things, both visible and 
invisible, the cause, origin, and beginning ; the Son is the 
Word, wisdom, and image of the Father ; the Holy Spirit is 
the eternal virtue and power proceeding from the Father and 
the Son. However, it must be allowed, that this doctrine 
far exceeds the comprehension of the human mind ; we must 
therefore be content to wait till we come to heaven for a 
perfect knowledge thereof." 

VI. 

39. That the Tenets of the aforesaid Theology appear to be 
erroneous, after the idea of a Trinity of Persons, and the con- 
sequent idea of Three Gods, has been rejected, and the idea of 
One God, in whom is a Divine Trinity, received in its stead. 

BRIEF ANALYSIS. 

40. The reason why the tenets of the present church, which 
are founded upon the idea of three Gods, derived from the 
doctrine of a trinity of persons literally understood, appear 
erroneous, after the idea of one God, in whom is a divine 
trinity, has been received in its stead, is, because, till this 
truth is received, we cannot see what is erroneous : the case 
herein is like a person, who in the night time, by the light 
of some stars only, sees various objects, especially images, 
and believes them to be living men ; or like one, who in 
the twilight before sunrise, as he lies in his bed, fancies he 
sees goblins in the air, and believes them to be angels : or 



DOCTRINE OF THE NT.1V CHURCH. 25 

like a person, who sees many things in the delusive light of 
phantasy, and believes them to be real : such things, it is 
well known, do not appear according to their true qualities, 
until the person comes to enjoy the light of the day, or, in 
other words, until his understanding is broad awake. The 
case is the same with the spiritual things of the church, 
which have been erroneously and falsely perceived, and 
even confirmed, when genuine truths present themselves 
in their own light, which is the light of heaven. Who 
is there that cannot understand, that all tenets found- 
ed on the idea of three Gods must be interiorly erroneous 
and false ? I say interiorly, because the idea of God enters 
into every thing belonging to the church, religion, and 
worship; and theological matters have their residence 
above all others in the human mind, and among these the 
idea of God is the principal or supreme ; wherefore if this 
be false, all beneath it, in consequence of the principle 
from whence they flow, must likewise be false or falsified ; 
for that which is supreme, being also the inmost, constitutes 
the very essence of all that is derived from it ; and the 
essence, like a soul, forms them into a body, after its own 
image ; and when in its descent it lights upon truths, it 
even infects them with its own blemish and error. The idea 
of three Gods in theology may be compared to a disorder 
seated in the heart or lungs, in which the patient fancies 
himself to be in health, because his physician, not know- 
ing his disease, persuades him that he is so ; but if the phy- 
sician knows it, and still persuades the patient that he is in 
health, he deserves the charge of deep malignity. 

VII. 

41. That then true saring Faith, which is a Faith in 
One God, united with Good Works, is achnoiclcdgcd and 
received, 

BRIEF ANALYSIS. 

. 42. The reason why this faith, which is a faith in one 
God, is acknowledged and received as truly savinc, when 
the former faith, which is a faith in three Gods, is rejected, 
is, because till this is the case it cannot be seen in its proper 
form : for the faith of the present day is set forth as the only 
saving faith, because it is a faith in one God, and a faith in 
a Saviour ; but it must be observed, that this faith hath two 
faces, the one internal, and the other external ; its internal 
3 



26 



A BRIEF EXPOSITION OF THE 



face is formed from the perception of three Gods, (for who 
perceives or thinks any otherwise ? Let every one examine 
himself) ; whereas its external face is formed from the con- 
fession of one God, (for who confesses or speaks otherwise? 
let every one examine himself) ; these two faces are alto- 
gether discordant with each other, so that the external is not 
acknowledged by the internal, nor is the internal known by 
the external. From this disagreement, and the vanishing 
of the one out of sight of the other, a confused idea of 
tilings pertaining to salvation has been conceived and brought 
forth in the church. It is otherwise, when the internal and 
external faces accord together, and mutually regard and ac- 
knowledge each other as one ; that this is the case, when 
one God, in whom is a divine trinity, is not only perceived 
by the mind, but likewise acknowledged by the mouth, is 
self-evident. That the tenet of the Father's being alienated 
from mankind, is then abolished, together with that of His 
reconciliation ; and that quite another doctrine takes place 
concerning imputation, remission of sins, regeneration, and 
salvation thence derived : will clearly be seen in the work 
itself, in the light of reason illustrated by divine truths from 
the Sacred Scripture. This faith is called a faith united 
with good works, because without this union it is impossi- 
ble to have faith in one God. 

VIII. 

43. And that this Faith is in God the Saviour Jesus Christ, 
which in its simple Form is as follows : I. That there is One 
God, in whom is a Divine Trinity, and that lie is the Lord 
Jesus Christ. II. That saving Faith is to believe in Him. 
III. That Evils ought to be shunned, because they arc of the 
Devil and from the Devil. IV. That Good Works ought to 
be done, because they arc of God and from God. V. And 
that they ought to be done by Man as of himself, but with a 
Belief that they arc from the Lord, operating in him and by him. 

BRIEF ANALYSIS. 

44. This is the faith of the New Church in its simple form, 
which will appear more fully in the Appendix, and still more 
at large in the first part of the work itself, where we shall 
treat of the Lord God the Saviour, and of the trinity in Him ; 
of love to God, and love towards our neighbour ; of faith and 
its conjunction with those two loves ; also in the other parts, 



DOCTRINE OF THE NEW CHURCH. 



■27 



which will follow in their proper order. But it is necessary 
that this preliminary concerning the above-mentioned faith 
should here be briefly illustrated. The Jirst position, viz. 
That there is one God, in whom is a Divine Trinity, and that 
He is the Lord Jesus Christ, is summarily illustrated in the 
following manner. It is a certain and established truth, that 
God is one, that His essence is indivisible, and that there is a 
trinity ; since, therefore, God is one, and His essence is indi- 
visible, it follows, that God is one person, and that a trinity is 
in that person. That this is the Lord Jesus Christ appears 
from hence, that He was conceived of God the Father, Luke 
i. 34, 35 ; and that thus as to His soul and essential life he is 
God ; and, therefore, as He Himself said, that the Father and 
He are one, John x. 39 ; that He is in the Father, and the 
Father in Him, John xiv. 11), 11; that he who seeth Him 
and knowcth Him, seeth and knoweth the Father, John xiv. 
7, 9 ; that no one seeth and knoweth the Father, but He who 
is in the bosom of the Father, John i. 18 ; that all things be- 
longing to the Father are His, John iii. 35. chap. xvi. 15 ; 
that He is the Way, the Truth, and the Life, and that no one 
cometh unto the Father but by Him, John xiv. G ; conse- 
quently, from Him, because He is in Him, and thus is He 
Himself; and, according to Paul, that in Him dwells all the 
fullness of the Godhead bodily, Coloss. ii. 9 ; and, according 
to Isaiah, " Unto us a Child is born, unto us a Son is given, 
whose name is God, Father of Eternity" ix. 5 ; and again, 
that He hath power over all flesh, John xvii. 2 ; and that He 
hath all power in heaven and earth, Matt, xxviii. 18 : whence 
it follows, that He is the God of heaven and earth. The 
second position, viz. That saving faith is to believe in Him, is 
illustrated thus : " Jesus said, He that believeth in Me, shall 
not die eternally, but shall live," John xi. 25, 2G ; " This is 
the will of the Father, that every one who believeth in the 
Son may have eternal life," John vi. 49 ; " God so loved the 
world, that He gave His only begotten Son, that whoso- 
ever believeth in Him, should not perish, but have everlasting 
life," John iii. 15, 1G ; " He that believeth in the Son, hath 
everlasting life, but he that believeth not the Son, shall not 
see life, but the wrath of God abideth on him," John iii. 3G. 
The three remaining propositions, viz. That evils ought to be 
shunned, because they are of the devil and from the devil ; 
and that good works ought to be done, because they are of 
God and from God ; but that man ought to believe, that they 
are from the Lord, operating in him and by him, have no 



28 



A BRIEF EXPOSITION OF THE 



need of illustration and proof, for the whole Sacred Scripture, 
from beginning to cud, confirms them, and, in short, teaches 
nothing else but to shun evils, and do good, and to believe in 
the Lord : besides, without these three there cannot be any 
religion, for all religion relates to life ; and life consists in 
shunning evils, and in doing good, which cannot be done by 
man, except as of himself; wherefore if these three are re- 
moved from the church, the Sacred Scripture, together with 
religion, is likewise removed at the same time ; in which 
case the church is no longer a church. For a further ac- 
count of the faith of the New Church, in its universal and 
particular form, see below, n. 116,117; all which will be 
demonstrated in the work itself. 

IX. 

45. That the Faith of the present day has separated Reli- 
gion from the Church, since Religion consists in the Ac- 
knowledgment of One God, and in the Worship of Him, from 
Faith grounded in Charity. 

BRIEF ANALYSIS. 

40. What nation is there upon the face of the earth, pos- 
sessed of religion and sound reason, that does not know and 
believe, that there is one God, and that to do evils is contrary 
to Him, and that to do good is well-pleasing to Him, and that 
man must do this from his soul, from his heart, and from his 
strength, although it is by influx from God ; and that herein 
consists religion ? Who, therefore, does not see, that to con- 
fess three persons in the Godhead, and to -assert that in good 
works there is nothing of salvation, is to separate religion 
from the church ? Yet so it is asserted in these words : " That 
faith justifies without good works," n. 12, ( a ) ('') ; "that 
works are not necessary to salvation, nor to faith, because sal- 
vation and faith are neither preserved nor retained by good 
works," n. 12, («) ( h ) (">) (") ; consequently, that there is no 
bond of conjunction between faith and good works : it is in- 
deed said afterwards, " that good works nevertheless follow 
faith, as fruit is produced from a tree," n. 13, (') ( n ), but 
then let us ask, who does them, nay, who thinks of them, or 
who is spontaneously led to perform them, while a person 
knows or believes that they do not at all contribute to salva- 
tion, and also, that no one can do any good thing towards 
salvation of himself, and so on 1 If it be alleged that the 



DOCTRINE OF THE NEW CHURCH. 



29 



leaders of the church have still conjoined faith w ith good 
works, it may be said in reply, that this conjunction, when 
closely inspected, is not conjunction, but mere adjunction, 
and this only like a superfluous appendage, that neither co- 
heres nor adheres in any other manner than as a dark back- 
ground to a portrait, which serves to set off the figure repre- 
sented, and give it more the appearance of life : it may be 
said further, that inasmuch as religion has relation to life, and 
this consists in good works according to the truths of faith, it 
is evident that real religion is the portrait or figure represented 
of itself, and not the mere shady appendage ; yea, that when 
good works are regarded as such an appendage, they must be 
reputed by many as of no more account than the tail of a 
horse, which, as contributing nothing to the horse's strength, 
may be cut off at pleasure. Who can rationally conclude 
otherwise, while he understands such expressions as these 
according to their^ obvious meaning : " That it is a folly to 
imagine that the works of the second table of the Decalogue 
justify in the sight of God," n. 12, ('') ; and these : "That 
if any one believes he shall therefore obtain salvation, because 
he hath charity, he brings a rcproacli upon Christ," n. 12, 

( e ) ; as also these : " That good works are utterly to be ex- 
cluded, in treating of justification and eternal life," n. 12, 

( f ) ; with more to the same purpose f Who, therefore, when 
he reads afterwards, that good works necessarily follow faith, 
and that if they do not follow, the faith is a false and not a true 
faith, n. 13, ( p ) ( y ), with more to the same purpose, attends 
to it ? or if he attends to it, understands whether such good works 
are attended with any perception or consciousness ? yet good 
which proceeds from man without his having a perception or 
consciousness of it, has no more life in it than if it came from 
a statue. But if we inquire more deeply into the rise of this 
doctrine, it will appear as though the leading Reformers first 
laid down faith alone as their rule, in order that they might 
be severed from the Roman Catholics, as mentioned above, 
n. 21, 22, 23 ; and that afterwards they adjoined thereto the 
works of charity, that their system might not appear to con- 
tradict the Sacred Scriptures, but have the semblance of 
religion, and thus be salved over. 



30 



A BRIEF EXPOSITION OF THE 



X. 

47. That the Faith of the present Church cannot be con- 
joined with Charity, and produce any Fruits, which are Good 
Works. 

BRIEF ANALYSIS. 

48. Before we proceed to the proof of this proposition, we 
shall first explain the origin and nature of charity, and the 
origin and nature of faith, and thus the origin and nature of 
good works, which are called fruits. Faith is truth, where- 
fore the doctrine of faith is the doctrine of truth ; and the 
doctrine of truth has its sent in the understanding, and thence 
in the thought, and from the thought descends into the 
speech ; wherefore it teaches what we are to will, and what 
we are to do, thus that evils, and what evils, are to be shunned, 
and that good works, and what good works, are to be done. 
When man from such a principle does good, then good con- 
joins itself with truth, because the will is conjoined with the 
understanding, for good appertains to the will, and truth to 
the understanding ; from this conjunction arises the affection 
of good, which in its essence is charity, and the affection of 
truth, which in its essence is faith, and these two united to- 
gether constitute a marriage ; from which marriage good 
works are produced, as fruits from a tree ; and hence they 
become the fruits of good, and the fruits of truth ; the lat- 
ter are signified in the Word by grapes, but the former by 
olives. 

49. From this generation of good works, it is evident, that 
faith alone cannot possibly produce or beget any works, that 
deserve the name of fruits, any more than a woman can of 
herself produce any offspring without the concurrence of a 
man ; wherefore the fruits of faith is a vain expression, and a 
word without meaning. Besides, throughout the whole world, 
nothing ever was or can be produced, but from a marriage of 
two, one whereof has relation to good, and the other to truth, 
or, in the opposite sense, one to evil, and the other to what is 
false ; consequently, no works can be conceived, much less 
brought into existence, but from such marriage, good works 
from the marriage of good and truth, and evil works from the 
marriage of evil and what is false. 

50. The reason why charity cannot be conjoined with the 
faith of the present church, and, consequently, why good 
works cannot spring from some sort of marriage union be- 
tween them, is, because imputation supplies every thing, re- 



DOCTRINE OF THE NEW CHURCH. 



31 



mits guilt, justifies, regenerates, sanctifies, imparts the life 
of heaven and thus salvation, and all this freely, without any 
works of man : in this case, what is charity, which ought to 
be united with faith, but something vain and superfluous, and 
a mere addition and supplement to imputation and justifica- 
tion, to which nevertheless it adds no weight or value 1 Be- 
sides, a faith founded on the idea of three Gods is erroneous, 
as has been shown above, n. 39, 49 ; and with an erroneous 
faith, charity, that in itself is charity, cannot be conjoined. 
There are two reasons given for believing that there is no 
bond of union between that faith and charity ; the one is, be- 
cause they make their faith to be of a spiritual quality, but 
charity merely natural and moral, imagining that there can 
be no conjunction between what is spiritual and what is nat- 
ural : the other reason is, lest any thing of man, and so any 
thing of merit, should gain admission into their faith, which 
they suppose to be alone of a saving nature. Furthermore, 
between charity and that faith there is no conjunction, but 
with the new faith there is, which may be seen below, n. 
116,117. 

XI. 

51. That from the Faith of the present Church there results 
a Worship of the Mouth and hot of the Life, whereas the 
Worship of the Mouth is accepted by the Lord, in proportion 
as it proceeds f rum the Worship of the Life. 

JiRlEF ANALYSIS. 

52. This is testified by experience : how few are there at 
this day, who form their lives after the precepts of the Deca- 
logue, and other precepts of the Lord, from a religious prin- 
ciple ? And how few are there at this day, who desire to 
look their own evils in the face, and to perform actual repen- 
tance, and thus enter upon the worship of the life ? or who, 
among those that make pretensions to piety, perforin any 
other repentance than that of the mouth, which consists in 
words only, confessing themselves to be sinners, and praying, 
according to the doctrine of the church, that God the Father, 
for the sake of His Son, who suffered upon the cross for their 
sins, took away their damnation, and atoned for them with 
His blood, would mercifully forgive their transgressions, that 
so they might be presented without spot or blemish before 
His judgment-seat ? Who does not see, that this worship is 
that of the lungs only, and not of the heart, consequently that 



32 



A BRIEF EXPOSITION OF THE 



it is external worship, and not internal ? for it is a prayer for 
the remission of sins, when yet man is not conscious of a 
single sin that he has ; and, if he did know of any, he 
would cover it over with favour and indulgence, or with a 
faith that is to purify and absolve him, without any works of 
his. But this conduct may be compared to that of a servant, 
who should go to his master with his face and clothes be- 
daubed with soot and filth, and say, Sir, wash me ; would 
not his master in such case naturally say to him, Thou fool- 
ish servant, what is it thou sayest 1 lo ! there is water, soap, 
and a towel, hast thou not hands of thy own, and strength to 
use them ? wash thyself: thus also the Lord God will say, 
The means of purification are provided by Me, and from Me 
also thou hast will and power, wherefore use these My gifts 
and talents, as thy own, and thou shalt be purified. Take 
another example by way of illustration : suppose you should 
pray a thousand times at home and at church, that God the 
Father, for the sake of His Son, would preserve you from the 
devil, and should not at the same time, from that freedom of 
will, in which you are perpetually kept by the Lord, keep 
yourself from evil, and so from the devil ; you could not in 
this case be preserv ed even by legions of angels sent from the 
Lord ; for the Lord cannot act contrary to His own divine 
order, which is, that man should examine himself, discover 
his evils, resist them, and this as of himself, yet from the 
Lord. This does not indeed at this day appear to be the 
gospel, nevertheless it is the gospel, for the gospel is salva- 
tion by the Lord. The reason why the worship of the mouth 
is accepted by the Lord according to the worship of the life, 
is, because the speech of man before God, and before the 
angels, has its sound from the affection of his love and faith, 
and these two are in man according to his life ; wherefore, 
reader, if the love of God and faith in Him are in thy life, 
the sound of thy voice will be like that of a dove ; but if 
self-love and self-confidence are in thy life, the sound of thy 
voice will be like that of an owl, howsoever you may en- 
deavour to imitate the dove : the spiritual [principle], which 
is within the sound, is the cause of this. 

XII. 

53. That the Doctrine of the present Church is interwoven 
with many Paradoxes, which are to be embraced by Faith ; 
and that therefore its Tenets gain admission into the Memory 



DOCTRINE OF THE NEW CHURCH. 



33 



only, and not into any part of the Understanding above the 
Memory, but merely into confirmations below it. 

BRIEF ANALYSIS. 

54. The rulers of the church insist, that the understand- 
ing is to be kept under obedience to faith, nay, that faith, 
properly speaking, is a faith in what is unknown, which is 
blind, and only a faith of the night : this is their first para- 
dox ; for faith is of truth, and truth is of faith ; and truth, 
before it can become an object of faith, must be seen in its 
own light and understood ; otherwise what is false may be 
believed as true. The paradoxes flowing from such a faith 
are many ; as, that God the Father begat a Son from eternity, 
and that the Holy Spirit proceeds from both, and that each of 
these three is a person by Himself and a God : that the Lord, 
both as to His soul and body, was from the mother : that the 
above three persons, consequently three Gods, created the 
universe ; and that one of them descended, and assumed hu- 
man nature, to reconcile the Father, and thus to save man- 
kind ; and that they who by grace obtain faith, and believe 
these paradoxes, are saved by the imputation, application, and 
translation, of His righteousness to themselves ; and that man, 
at his first reception of that faith, is like a statue, a stock, or 
a stone, and that faith comes by the mere hearing of the 
Word ; that faith alone without the works of the law, or en- 
tirely independent of charity, is saving ; and that it produces 
the remission of sins without any previous repentance ; and 
that, merely by virtue of such remission of sins, the impeni- 
tent are justified, regenerated, and sanctified ; and that after- 
wards charity, good works, and repentance, spontaneously 
follow : besides many other paradoxes of a like nature, all 
which, like offspring from an illegitimate bed, have issued 
from the doctrine founded on the idea of three Gods. 

55. What wise man does not see, that such paradoxes en- 
ter only into the memory, and not into the understanding 
above the memory, although they may be confirmed by rea- 
sonings from appearances and fallacies below it 1 for the hu- 
man understanding is capable of seeing by two kinds of 
light, one of which is from heaven, and the other from the 
world ; the light from heaven, which is spiritual, flows into 
the human mind above the memory, but the light from the 
world, which is natural, Lelow it. That man, from this 
latter light, can confirm whatever he pleases, and falses 



34 



A BRIEF EXPOSITION OF THE 



equally as well as truths, and that after confirmation he sees 
falses altogether as truths, has been shown in a memorable 
relation inserted in a work lately published concerning Con- 
jugial Love, n. 233. 

5G. To what has been said shall be added the following 
arcanum from heaven : all those paradoxes, according to their 
confirmations, abide in the minds of men, bound together as 
into one bundle, or wound up together as into one ball, and 
enter at the same time into every individual proposition that 
is stated from the doctrine of the church ; so that when either 
faith, charity, or repentance, and still more when imputation 
or justification is mentioned, they all enter and are included 
in each particular. Man himself indeed does not perceive 
any such accumulation, or bundling together of such paradoxes 
in every individual proposition from the doctrine of the church, 
or on every mention of the above expressions ; but the angels 
that are with man perceive it, and call it mahta, that is, con- 
fusion and darkness. 

57. I am well aware, that very many at this day, tinctured 
with the paradoxes of this faith, will be ready to say, how can 
theological truths be perceived by the understanding? are 
they not spiritual, and above its comprehension ? explain 
therefore, if thou canst, the mystery of redemption and justifi- 
cation, that reason may view it, and acquiesce therein. This 
mystery, then, shall be opened in the following manner. Who 
does not know that God is one, and that besides Him there is 
no other, and that God is essential love and essential wisdom, 
or, that He is essential good and essential truth ; and that the 
self-same God, as to divine truth, which is the Word, descend- 
ed and assumed humanity to remove the hells, and conse- 
quently damnation, from man, which he effected by combats 
with, and victories over the devil, that is, over all the hells, 
which at that time infested and spiritually slew every man 
coming into the world ; and that afterwards He glorified His 
humanity, by uniting in it divine truth with divine good, and 
thus returned to the Father, from whom He came forth ? When 
these things are perceived, then the following passage in John 
may be understood : " The Word Das with God, and God 
was the Word, and the Word became Jlesh," chap. i. 1, 14: 
and also the following in the same Evangelist; " I went forth 
from the Father, and came into the world ; again I leave the 
world, and go to the Father," chap. xvi. 28. Hence also it is 
evident, that unless the Lord had come into the world, no 
person could have been saved, and that they are saved who 



DOCTRINE OF THE NEW CHURCH. 



35 



believe in Him, and lead a good life. This view of faith 
presents itself as clear as the day to those who are enlightened 
by the Word, and is the frontispiece of the faith of the New 
Church. See the Faith of the New Church in its universal 
and in its particular form, below, at n. 116, 117. 

XIII. 

53. That the Touts of the present Church cannot be learned 
and retained without great difficult y, nor can they be preached 
or taught without using great care and caution to concccd their 
nakedness, because sound reason neither discerns nor receives 
them. 

BRIEF ANALYSIS. 

59. That the understanding is to be kept under obedience 
to faith, is set as a motto before the tenets of the present 
church, to denote that their interiors are mysteries, or arcana, 
of too transcendent a nature to enter into the upper region 
of the understanding, and be there perceived, see above, 
n. 54. Those ministers of the church, who affect to excel 
in wisdom, and wish to be looked upon as oracles in spiritual 
things, imbibe and swallow down in the schools, such things 
especially as surpass the comprehension of others, which 
they do with avidity, but nevertheless with difficulty : and 
because they are thence accounted wise, and they who have 
distinguished and enriched themselves from such hidden stores 
are honoured with doctor's hats and episcopal robes, they re- 
volve in their thoughts, and teach from their pulpits, scarce 
any thing else but mysteries concerning justification by faith 
alone, and goods works as her humble attendants : and from 
their great erudition concerning both faith and good works, 
they in a wonderful manner sometimes separate and sometimes 
conjoin them; comparatively as if they held faith by itself in 
one hand, and the works of charity in the other, and at one 
time extend their arms and so separate them, and at another time 
bring their hands together, and so conjoin them. But this shall 
be illustrated by examples. They teach, that good works are 
not necessary to salvation, because if done by man they are 
meritorious ; at the same time they also teach, that good works 
necessarily follow faith, and that both together make one in 
the article of salvation. They teach, that faith without good 
works, as being alive, justifies ; and at the same time, that 
faith without goods works, as being dead, does not justify. 
They teach, that faith is neither preserved nor retained by 



36 A BRIEF EXPOSITION OF THE 

good works ; and at the same time, that good works proceed 
from faith, as fruit from a tree, light from the sun, and heat 
from fire. They teach, that good works being adjoined to 
faith make it perfect ; and at the same time, that being con- 
joined as in a marriage, or in one form, they deprive faith of 
its saving essence. They teach, that a Christian is not under 
the law ; and at the same time, that he must be in the daily 
practice of the law. They teach, that if good works are in- 
termixed in the business of salvation by faith, as in the remis- 
sion of sins, justification, regeneration, vivification, and salva- 
tion, they are hurtful ; but if not intermixed, that they are profit- 
able. They teach, that God crowns His own gifts, which 
are good works, with rewards even of a spiritual nature, but 
not with salvation and eternal life, because faith without works, 
they say, is entitled to the crown of eternal life. They teach, 
that faith alone is like a queen, who walks in a stately manner, 
with good works as her train of attendants behind her ; but if 
these join themselves to her in front, and embrace her, she is 
cast from her throne, and called an adulteress. But particular- 
ly, when they treat of faith and good works at the same time, 
they view merit on the one hand, and no merit on the other, mak* 
ing choice of expressions which they use in two different senses, 
one for the laity, and the other for the clergy, for the laity 
that its nakedness may not appear, and for the clergy that it 
may. Consider now, whether a person hearing such things 
can draw from them any doctrine leading to salvation, or 
whether he will not rather, from the apparent contradictions 
therein, become blind, and afterwards grope for the objects of 
salvation, like a person walking in the dark : who in this case 
can tell from the evidence of works, whether he hath any faith 
or not ; and whether it is better to omit good works on account 
of the danger of merit, or to do them for fear of the loss of 
faith? But do you, my friend, separate and snatch yourself 
away from such contradictions, and shun evils as sins, and do 
good, and believe in the Lord, and saving justification will be 
given you. 

XIV. 

60. That the doctrine of the Faith of the present Church as- 
cribes to God human properties ; as, that He viewed man from 
anger, that He required to be reconciled, that He is reconciled 
through the love He bore the Son, and by His intercession; and 
that He require il to be appeased by the sight of His Son's suf- 
ferings, and thus to be brought back to mercy; and that He 



DOCTRINE OF THE NEW CHURCH. 



37 



imputes the righteousness of His Son to an unrighteous man 
who supplicates it from Faith alone; and that thus from an 
enemy He makes him a friend, and from a child of wrath a 
child of grace. 

BRIEF ANALYSIS. 

61. Who does not know, that God is essential mercy and 
clemency, inasmuch as He is essential love and essential good- 
ness, and that these properties are His esse or essence ? And 
who does not hereby see, that it is a contradiction to assert, 
that mercy itself, or goodness itself, can view man from anger, 
become his enemy, turn Himself away from him, and deter- 
mine on his damnation, and still continue to be the same 
Divine Esse or God ? Such things can scarcely be attributed 
to a good man, but only to a wicked man, thus not to an angel 
of heaven, but only to an angel of hell ; wherefore it is 
abominable to ascribe them to God. That they have been 
ascribed to Him, appears evident from the declarations of many 
fathers, councils, and churches, from the first ages to the present 
day ; and also from the inferences which have necessarily fol- 
lowed from first principles into their derivatives, or from causes 
into their effects, as from a head into the members ; such as, 
that He required to be reconciled ; that He is reconciled 
through the love He bears towards the Son, and by His inter- 
cession and mediation ; that He required to be appeased by the 
view of the extreme sufferings of His Son, and so to be brought 
back to mercy, and constrained as it were to show it, and thus 
from an enemy to be made a friend, and to adopt those who 
were the children of wrath as the children of grace. That 
the notion that God can impute the righteousness and merits 
of His Son to an unrighteous man, who supplicates it from 
faith alone, is also a mere human invention, will be seen in 
the last analysis of this little work. 

62. They who have perceived that meje human properties 
are unworthy of God, and yet are attributed to Him, have said, 
in order to defend the system of justification once conceived, 
and to varnish over its outside, that anger, revenge, damnation, 
and the like, are predicated of His justice, and are therefore 
mentioned in many parts of the Word, and as it were appro- 
priated to God. But by the anger of God, in the Word, is 
signified evil in man, which, being contrary to God, is called 
the anger of God ; not that God is ever angry with man, but 
that man, from the evil that is in him, is angry with God ; and 
because evil carries with it its own punishment, as good does 



38 



A BRIEF EXPOSITION OF THE 



its own reward, therefore while evil punishes the evil-doer, it 
appears to him as though he was punished by God : the case 
in this respect is the same as with a criminal, who attributes 
his punishment to the law, or like a person who blames the 
fire for burning him when he puts his hand into it, or a drawn 
sword for wounding him when he rushes upon the point of it, 
while his adversary is standing upon his own defence : such 
is the nature of the justice of God. But of this more may be 
seen in the Apocalypse Revealed, where it treats of justice and 
judgment in God and from God, n. GG8. That anger is as- 
cribed to Him, may be seen, n. 635 ; as likewise revenge, n. 
658; but this is only in the literal sense, which is written by 
appearances and correspondences, and not in the spiritual 
sense, wherein truth is in its own light. This I can affirm, 
that whenever the angels hear any one say, that God determin- 
ed in anger, on the damnation of the human race, and as an 
enemy was reconciled by His Son, as by another God begotten 
from Himself, they are affected in a manner similar to those, 
who, from an uneasiness in their bowels and stomach, are ex- 
cited to vomiting ; on which occasions they say, what can be 
more insane than to affirm such things of God? 

63. The reason why they have ascribed human properties 
to God, is, because all spiritual perception and illustration is 
from the Lord alone ; for the Lord is the Word or Divine 
Truth, and "is the true light which enlighteneth every man" 
John i. 1, 9 : he also says, "I am come a light into the world, 
that whosoever belicvcth in Me may not abide in darkness," 
John xii. 46 ; and this light, and perception thence derived, 
enter by influx into such only as acknowledge Him for the 
God of heaven and earth, and approach Him alone, and not 
into such as entertain an idea of three Gods, which has been 
the case from the time the Christian church began to be estab- 
lished : this idea of three Gods, being a merely natural idea, 
is receptive of no other light than natural light, and cannot 
be opened to admit and receive spiritual light ; hence it is, 
that they have seen no other properties in God, than such as 
are natural. Furthermore, had they seen how incongruous 
these human properties are to the divine essence, and had they 
removed them from the article of justification, they must then 
have entirely departed from their religion, which from the be- 
ginning was founded on the worship of three Gods, thus before 
the time appointed for the New Church, when the fullness and 
restoration [of the Christian religion] is to take place. 



DOCTRINE OF THE NEW CHURCH. 



39 



XV. 

64. That from the Faith of the present Church have been 
produced, and still may be produced, monstrous Births; such 
as, instantaneous Salvation by an immediate act of Mercy ; 
Predestination ; the notions that God has no respect unto the 
actions of Men, but unto Faith alone ; that there is no con- 
nection between Charity and Faith ; that Man in Conversion 
is like a Stock; with many more Heresies of the same kind; 
/ikcwisc concerning the Sacraments o f Baptism and the Holy 
S apper, as to the advantages reasonably to be expected from 
them, whin considered according to the Doctrine of Justifca- 
iion by Faith alone ; as also with regard to the Person of Christ; 
and that the Heresies from the frst ages to the present day, 
have sprung up from no other source, than from the idea of 
Three Gods. 

BRIEF ANALYSIS. 

63. That no other salvation is believed at this day, than 
such as is instantaneous, from an immediate act of mercy, is 
evident from hence, that a mere faith of the mouth, accompani- 
ed with a confidence proceeding from the lungs, and not with 
charity, (whereby, nevertheless, the faith of the mouth becomes 
real, and the confidence of the lungs becomes that of the heart,) 
is supposed to complete all the work of salvation ; for if the 
co-operation is taken away, which is effected through the ex- 
ercises of charity by man as of himself, the spontaneous co- 
operation which is said to follow faith of itself, becomes passive 
action, which is nonsense and a contradiction in terms; for 
supposing this to be the case, what need would there be of any 
thing more than some such momentary and immediate prayer 
as this : "Save me, O God, for the sake of the sufferings of 
Thy Son, who hath washed me from my sins in His own blood, 
and presents me pure, righteous, and holy before Thy throne;" 
and this ejaculation of the mouth might avail even at the hour 
of death, if not sooner, as a seed of justification. That never- 
theless instantaneous salvation, by an immediate act of mercy, 
is at this day a fiery flying serpent in the church, and that 
thereby religion is abolished, security introduced, and dam- 
nation imputed to the Lord, may be seen in n. 340 of the work 
concerning Divine Providence, published at Amsterdam in 
the year 1764. 

66. Predestination is also a birth conceived and brought forth 
from the faith of the present church, because it originates in 



40 



A BRIEF EXPOSITION OF THE 



a belief of instantaneous salvation by an immediate act of 
mercy, and in a belief that man has not the smallest degree 
of ability or free-will in spiritual tilings, concerning which see 
below, n. GS ; that this follows from the forementioned tenets, 
as one fiery serpent from another, or one spider from another, 
may be seen above : predestination also follows from the sup- 
position, that man is as it were inanimate in the act of conversion, 
that he is like a stock, and that afterwards he is unconscious 
whether he is a stock made alive by grace, or not; for it is 
said, that God, by the hearing of the Word, gives faith, when 
and where He willeth, n. 10 ( a ), consequently of His good 
pleasure ; and likewise that election is of the mere grace of 
God, independently of any action on man's part, whether such 
activity proceed from the powers of nature or of grace : Formula 
Concordia:, p. 821. App. p. 182. The works which follow 
faith as evidences thereof, appear to the mind while it reflects 
on them like the works of the flesh, while the spirit which op- 
erates thrm does not make known from what origin they pro- 
ceed, but supposes them, like faith, to be the effects of grace 
and the good pleasure of God. Hence it is plain, that the 
tenet of predestination hath sprung from the faith of the present 
church, as a sucker from its root ; and I can venture to assert, 
that it has followed as the almost unavoidable consequence of 
such faith. This tenet was first broached by the Predestinari- 
ans, and afterwards adopted by Godoschalcus, then by Calvin 
and his followers, and lastly established and confirmed by the 
Synod of Dort, whence it was conveyed into the church, by the 
Supra and Infra Lapsarians, as the palladium of religion, or 
rather as the head of Gorgon or Medusa engraved on the shield 
of Pallas. But what more detestable, or more cruel notion 
could have been devised and entertained of God, than that any 
part of the human race are predestinated to damnation? For 
it would be a horrible idea, that the Lord, who is essential 
love and essential mercy, designed that the bulk of mankind 
should be born for hell, or that myriads of myriads should be 
born devoted to destruction, or, in other words, born to be 
devils and satans ; and that, out of His divine wisdom, winch 
is infinite, He should make no provision for those who lead 
good lives, and acknowledge God, whereby they might escape 
everlasting fire and punishment : whereas the Lord is the 
Creator and Saviour of all, and He alone leadeth all, and will- 
eth not the death of any ; what then can be asserted or con- 
ceived more horrible, than that multitudes of nations and peo- 
ple should, under His auspices, and in His sight, from a pre- 



DOCTRINE OF THE NEW CHURCH. 



41 



destinatcd decree, be delivered up to the devil as his prey, to 
glut his insatiate appetite ? Yet this is a birth of the faith of 
the present church ; but the faith of the New Church abhors 
it as a monster. 

67. That God has no respect unto the actions of men, but 
unto (kith alone, is a new heresy, the offspring of the two for- 
mer, concerning which we have already spoken above, n. 64, 
65 ; and what is wonderful, it is derived from faith alone deeply 
examined and attentively considered, which has been done by 
the most sagacious divines of this age, and is a third offspring, 
begotten by that faith, and brought forth by predestination, 
that she-wolf, as a mother ; but whereas it is insane, impious, 
and machiavclian, it has hitherto been kept included as it were 
in the uterine coats, or secundines, that came from the mother ; 
lest its hideous form should appear : but the madness and im- 
piety of it may be seen described and exploded in the Ajjoc- 
ali/p.<c Revealed, n. 463. 

68. That there is not any connection between charity and 
faith, follows from these passages in their doctrine of justification, 
viz. That faith is imputed for righteousness without works, 
n. 12, : that faith does not justify as being formed from 
charity, n. 12, ( b ) : that good works are utterly to be excluded, 
in treating of justification and eternal life, n. 12, (*) : that good 
works are not necessary unto salvation, and that the assertion 
of their necessity ought to he totally rejected by the church, n. 
12, (s) ( h ) (') ( k ) : that salvation and faith arc neither preserv- 
ed nor retained by charity and the works thereof, n. 12, ( m ) 
(") : that good works, when blended in the matter of justifica- 
tion, are pernicious, n. 14, (s) : that the works of the spirit, 
or of grace, which follow faith as its fruits, contribute nothing 
to man's salvation, n. 14, and elsewhere: from all which 
it inevitably follows, that this faith of theirs has no connection 
with charity, and if it had, that the connection, according to 
their notion, would become injurious to salvation, because in- 
jurious to faith, which thus would no longer be the only means 
of salvation. That no connection between charity and that 
faith can actually exist, has been shown above, n. 47, 48, 49, 
50 ; wherefore it may be said, that it was providentially 
ordered, that the Reformers should be so zealous to reject 
charity and good works from their faith ; for had they con- 
joined them, it would have been like conjoining a leopard with 
a sheep, a wolf with a lamb, or a hawk with a dove; that this 
faith is also described in the Apocalypse by a leopard, may be 
seen in chap. xiii. 2, and also in the explanation thereof, in the 



42 



A BRIEF EXPOSITION OF THE 



Apocalypse Revealed, n. 572. But what is a church without 
faith, and what is faith without charity, consequently what is 
a church without the marriage of faith and charity 1 see n. 48 : 
this marriage constitutes the real church, and is the New 
Church which is now establishing by the Lord. 

69. That man in his conversion is like a stock, the faith of 
the present church acknowledges as its natural offspring in 
these express words : That man has not the smallest degree of 
ability in spiritual things, n. 15, ( a ) ( h ) ( c ) ; that in conver- 
sion he is like a stock, a stone, and a statue, and that he cannot 
so much as accommodate and apply himself to receive grace, 
but is like something that has not the use of any of the senses, 
n. 15, (') ; that man has only a locomotive power, where- 
by he is capable of going to church to hear the Word and the 
Gospel, n. 15, ( e ) ; but that a person who is regenerate by virtue 
of the Holy Ghost, from the new powers and gifts which he 
has received, does in a certain manner co-operate, n. 15, ( k ) ; 
besides many other things to the same purpose. This descrip- 
tion of man in his conversion, and during his repentance from 
evil works, is also an offspring produced from the said egg or 
womb, that is, from justification by faith alone, to the intent 
that man's works may be totally abolished, and not suffered to 
have the least conjunction with faith, not even to touch it. 
But seeing that such ideas are repugnant to the common per- 
ception of all men concerning man's conversion and repen- 
tance, they have added the following words : " There is a icidc 
difference between persons baptized and jjcrsons icnbaptizcd, 
for it is the doctrine of Paul, that all baptized persons have 
put on Christ, and are truly regenerated ; they arc then endow- 
ed with a freedom of will, whereby they not only can hear the 
Word of God, but can also assent to the same, and embrace it 
by faith," n. 15, ("'), and in the Formula Concordia, p. 675. 
I appeal to men of understanding, and beg them to weigh and 
consider, whether this latter quotation be any way consistent 
with the preceding ones, and whether it be not a contradic- 
tion to say that a Christian in a state of conversion is like a 
stock or a stone, so that he is not able so much as to accom- 
modate himself to the receiving of grace, when yet every Chris- 
tian is a baptized person, and by baptism became possessed, 
not only of a power to hear the Word of God, but also to assent 
to it, and embrace it by faith ; wherefore the comparing a Chris- 
tian to a stock or a stone is a simile that ought to be banished 
from all Christian churches, and to be done away, like a meteor 
that vanishes from before the eyes of a man waking out of 



DOCTRINE OF THE NEW CHURCH. 



43 



sleep ; for what can be more repugnant to reason ? But in order 
to elucidate the doctrine of the New Church concerning man's 
conversion, I will transcribe the following passage from one of 
the memorable relations in the Apocalypse Rt vealed. "How plain 
is it to see, that every man has liberty to think about God, or 
not to think about Him ; consequently that every man has the 
same liberty in spiritual things, as he has in civil and moral 
things : the Lord gives this liberty continually to all ; where- 
fore man becomes guilty or not guilty accordingly : man is man 
by virtue of this power, whereas a beast is a beast in conse- 
quence of its not possessing such a power ; so that man is capable 
of reforming and regenerating himself as of himself, provided 
he only acknowledge in his heart that his ability is from the 
Lord : every one who does the work of repentance, is reform- 
ed and regenerated: both must be done by man as of himself, 
but this as of himself is also from the Lord, because the Lord 
gives both the power to will and perform, and never takes it 
away from any one. It is true that man cannot contribute 
any tiling thereunto, nevertheless he is not created a statue, 
but a man, to do the work of repentance from the Lord as 
from himself: in this alone consists the reciprocality of love 
and faith, and of conjunction thereby, which the Lord earnest- 
ly wills to be done on the part of man : in a word, act of 
yourselves, and believe that you act from the Lord, for thus 
you will act as of yourselves. But the power so to act is not 
implanted in man by creation, because to act of himself is the 
prerogative of the Lord alone, but it is given continually; and 
in this case in proportion as man does good and acquires 
truth as of himself, he is an angel of heaven ; but in proportion 
as he does evil, and in consequence thereof confirms himself 
in what is false, Which also is done as of himself, in the same 
proportion he is a spirit of hell : that in this latter case also man 
acts as of himself, is evident from his prayers, as when he prays 
that he may be preserved from the devil, lest he should seduce 
him, and bring his own evils upon him. Every one however 
contracts guilt, who believes that he does of himself either 
good or evil ; but not he who believes that he acts as of him- 
self: for whatsoever a man believes he does of himself, that 
he appropriates to himself ; if he believes that he does good 
of himself, he appropriates to himself that good, and makes it 
his own, when nevertheless it is of God and from God ; and if 
he believes that he does evil of himself, he also appropriates 
that evil to himself, and makes it his own, when yet it is of 
the devil and from the devil." 



44 



A BRIEF EXPOSITION OF THE 



That many other false tenets, even concerning the sacra- 
ments of baptism and the holy supper, as to the benefits reason- 
ably to be expected from them, when considered according to 
the doctrine of justification by faith alone ; as likewise concern- 
ing the person of Christ ; together with all the heresies from 
the first ages down to the present day ; have flowed from no 
other source, than from a doctrine founded on the idea of three 
Gods ; we have not room to demonstrate within the limits of 
this epitome, but it shall be shown and proved at large in the 
work itself. 

XVI. 

70. That the last state of the present Chureh, when it is at 
an end, is meant by the Consummation of the Age, and the 
Coming of the Lore! at that period, Matt. xxiv. 3. 

BRIEF ANALYSIS. 

71. We read in Matthew, " The eliseiples eame to Jesus, 
and showed Him the buildings of the temple ; and Jesus said 
unto them, Verily I say unto you, there shedl not be left here 
one stone upon another, whieh shall not be thrown down. And 
the diseiples said unto Him, tell us when these things shedl be, 
anel espeeiedly what shall be the sign of Thy coming, and of 
the consummeition of the age," chap. xxiv. 1, 2, 3. At this 
day, the learned clergy and laity understand, by the destruction 
of the temple, its destruction by Vespasian; and by the coming 
of the Lord, and the consummation of the age, they understand 
the end and destruction of the world : but by the destruction 
of the temple is not only meant the destruction thereof by the 
Romans, but likewise the destruction of the present church ; 
and by the consummation of the age, and the coming of the Lord 
at that period, is meant the end of the present church and the 
establishment of a New Church by the Lord : that these things 
are there meant, is evident from the whole of that chapter from 
beginning to end, which treats solely of the successive declen- 
sions and corruptions of the Christian church, even to its de- 
struction, when it is at an end. That by the temple in a limit- 
ed sense is meant the temple at Jerusalem, in an extensive 
sense the church of the Lord, in a more extensive sense the 
angelic heaven, and in the most extensive sense the Lord as 
to His Humanity, may be seen in the Apoealypsc Revealed, n. 
529. That by the consummation of the age is meant the end 
of the church, which comes to pass when there remains no 
truth of doctrine from the Word but what has been falsified, 



DOCTRINE OF THE NEW CHURCH. 



45 



and thus consummated, is shown in n. 658, 676, 750, of the 
same work. That by the coining of the Lord is meant His 
coming in the Word, and at the same time the establishment of 
a New Church instead of the former, which is then brought 
to its consummation or end, evidently appears from His own 
words in the same chapter, from verse 30 to 134 ; as likewise 
from the two last chapters xxi. and xxii. of the Apocalypse, 
where are these words : " IJcsits am the Root and the Offspring 
of David, the Bright and Morning Star; and the spirit and 
the bride say, Come; and lit him that heareth say., Come; and 
him that is, athirst, let him eomc: Yea, I come quickly: Amen, 
wen so, come, Lord Jesus," chap. xxii. 17, 20. 

72. That the church is then at an end, when there are no 
longer any truths of faith, and hence no goods of charity there- 
in, is self-evident : that falses of faith extinguish the truths of 
doctrine, and evils of life consume the goods of charity ; and 
that wherever falses of faith are, there likewise are evils of life, 
and that wherever evils of life are, there likewise are falses of 
faith ; will be demonstrated in their proper places, when we come 
to treat of these matters. The reason why it has been hitherto 
unknown, that by the consummation of the age is meant the end 
of the church, is, because when falses are taught, and when the 
doctrine resulting from them is believed and honoured r.s ortho- 
dox, then it cannot possibly be known that the church is to be 
brought to a consummation ; for falses are regarded as truths, and 
truths as falses, and then the false explodes the truth, and black- 
ens it, like ink poured into clear water, or soot thrown upon white 
paper. For it is the general opinion, and the most learned of 
the present age proclaim it, that they enjoy the purest light of 
the Gospel, notwithstanding they are enveloped in thick dark- 
ness ; to such a degree of blindness are they reduced by the 
white speck that has covered over the pupils of their eyes. 

73. That in the 24th chapter of Matthew, the 13th of Mark, 
and the 21st of Luke, where similar passages occur, is not 
described the destruction of the temple and Jerusalem, but 
that the successive changes of the state of the Christian church 
are foretold, in regular order, even to its last state, when it 
comes to an end, will be shown in the large work ; and in the 
mean time, it may appear from these words in the abovemen- 
tioned evangelists : " Then shall appear the sign of the Son of 
Man, and thin sliall a!/ the tribes of the earth wail; and they 
shall see the Son of Man coming in the clouds of heaven with 
power and glory : and He shall send His angels with a great 
sound of a trumpet, and they shall gather together His elect 



46 



A BRIEF EXPOSITION OF THE 



from one end of the heavens to the other end thereof," Matt, 
xxiv. 30, 31 ; Mark xiii. 26, 27 ; Luke xxi. 27 : it is well known, 
that these things were neither seen nor heard at the destruc- 
tion of Jerusalem, and that it is the prevailing opinion at this day, 
that they will come to pass at the time of the last judgment. 
We likewise read of similar things in the Apocalypse, which 
from beginning to end treats solely of the last state of the 
church, where are these words : " Behold, Jesus Christ < onu th 
in the clouds, and all the tribes of the earth shall wail because 
of Him," chap. i. 5,7 : the particular explication of these words 
may be seen in the Apocalypse Revealed, n. 24 to 28 ; also 
what is signified by the tribes of the earth, and their wailing, 
n. 27, 348, 349. 

XVII. 

74. That the Infestation from Falses, and thence the Con- 
stimulation of every Truth, or the Desolation, which at this 
Day j)revails in the Christian Churches, is meant by the great 
Affliction, such as 7ims not from the Beginning of the World, 
nor ever shall be, Matt. xxiv. 21. 

. L BRIEF ANALYSIS. 

75. That the successive declensions and corruptions of the 
Christian church are foretold and described by the Lord in 
the 24th chapter of Matthew, may be seen above, n. 73 : 
after having spoken of false prophets that should arise, and of 
the abomination of desolation wrought by them, verses 11, 15, 
he adds, " Then shall be great affliction, si/eh as teas nut from 
the beginning of the world until now, nor ever shall be," verse 
21 ; whence it is evident, that by great affliction, in this as 
well as in other places throughout the Word, is meant the in- 
festation of truth by falses, until there remain no genuine truth 
derived from the Word, which is not falsified and by that means 
consummated. This has come to pass, by reason that the 
churches have not acknowledged the unity of God in the trinity, 
and His trinity in unity, in one person, but in three, and hence 
have founded a church in the mind upon the idea of three Gods, 
and in the mouth upon the confession of one God ; for by this 
means they have separated themselves from the Lord, and at 
length to such a degree, that they have no idea left of there 
being any Divinity in His Human Nature, (see the Apocalypse 
Revealed, n. 294,) when nevertheless the Lord as to His Hu- 
manity is Divine Truth Itself, and Divine Light Itself, as He 



DOCTRINE OF THE NSW CIU'RCII. 



A' 



abundantly teaches in His Word ; hence is the great affliction 
so prevalent at the present day : that this has been principally 
brought on by the doctrine of justification and imputation 
through the medium of faith alone, will be shown in the follow- 
ing pages. 

70. This affliction, or infestation of truth by falses, is treat- 
ed of in seven chapters of the Apocalypse ; and is what is meant 
by the black horse and the pale horse going forth from the 
book, the seals whereof the Lamb had opened, chap. vi. 5 to 
8 ; and by the beast ascending out of the abyss, which made 
war against the two witnesses, and slew them, chap. xi. 7, and 
following verses ; as also by the dragon which stood before the 
woman who was ready to be delivered, in order to devour her 
child, and pursued her into the desert, and there cast out of 
his mouth water as a flood, that he might cause her to be car- 
ried away of the flood, chap. xii. ; and likewise by the beast 
out of the sea, whose body was like that of a leopard, his feet 
like those of a bear, and his mouth like that of a lion, chap, 
xiii. 2 ; also by the three unclean spirits like frogs, which came 
out of the mouth of the dragon, out of the mouth of the beast, 
and out of the mouth of the false prophet, chap. xvi. 13 ; and 
moreover by these particulars, that after the seven angels had 
poured out the phials of the wrath of God, wherein were the 
seven last plagues, upon the earth, upon the sea, upon the rivers 
and fountains, upon the sun, upon the throne of the beast, 
upon Euphrates, and last of all upon the air, there was a great 
earthquake, such as had never been seen since men were 
created upon the earth, chap. xvi. : the earthquake here sig- 
nifies an inversion of the church, which is occasioned by 
falses and falsifications of truth. The like things are under- 
stood by these words : " Tlic angel put forth his sickle, and 
gathered the vine of the earth, and cast it into the great 
wine-press of the wrath of God ; and the wine-press was trod- 
den, and blood came out. of the wine-press, even unto the horses' 
bridles, for the space of a thousand and six hundred furlongs," 
chap. xiv. 10, 20 ; where blood signifies truth falsified : besides 
many other passages to the same purpose, in those seven chap- 
ters : but if you desire further information in this matter, turn 
to the explication thereof, and the memorable relations at the 
end of the chapters. 

XVIII. 

77. That there ironld be neither Love, nor Faith, nor the 
Knowledges of Good and Truth, in the last time of the Chris- 



48 



A BRIEF EXPOSITION OF THE 



tian Church, when it draws to an end, is understood by these 
words in the same 24th chapter of Matthew : " After the afflic- 
tion of those days, the Sun shall be darkened, and the Moon 
shall not give her light, and the Stars shall fall from Heaven, 
and the Powers of the Heavens shall be shaken," verse 29. 

BRIEF ANALYSIS. 

78. In the prophetic parts of the Word, the like things are 
said of the sun, moon, and stars, as here in Matthew, chap, 
xxiv. 29. Thus it is written in Isaiah : " Behold the cruel day 
of Jehovah comcth, the stars of heaven and the constellations 
thereof shall not give their light, the sun, shall be darkened at 
his rising, and the moon shall not cause her light to shine," 
Isaiah xiii. 9, 10: soinEzekiel: " When I shall put thee out, 
I iv ill cover the heavens, and make the stars thereof dark; 1 
7oill cover the sun with a cloud, and the moon shall not give her 
light, and I will set darkness upon thy land," xxxii. 7, 8 : in 
Joel : " The day of Jehovah comcth, a day of darkness ; the sun 
and moon shall not give their light, and the stars shall with- 
draw their shining," ii. 10 : again in the same prophet: " The 
sun shall be turned into darkness, and the moon into blood, be- 
fore the great day of Jehovah shall come" iii. 4 : " The day of 
Jehovah is near in the valley of decision ; the sun and moon are. 
darkened," iv. 15 : in the Apocalypse : " The fourth angel 
sounded, and the third part of the sun was smitten, and the third 
part of the stars, and the day shone not for a third part of it" 
vii. 12: and in another place, " The sun became black as sack- 
cloth of hair, and the moon became as blood," vi. 12. All the 
former passages treat of the last time of the Jewish church, 
which was when the Lord came into the world ; the same thing 
is meant here in Matthew and in the Apocalypse, only in ref- 
erence to the last time of the Christian church, when the Lord 
is to come again, but in the Word, which is Himself, and in 
which He is; wherefore immediately after those words in 
Matthew xxiv. 29, it follows, " And then shall appear the sign 
of the Son o f Man coming in the clouds o f the heavens," verse 
30. By the sun, in the above passages, is meant love, by the 
moon, faith, and by the stars, the knowledges of good and truth, 
and by the powers of the heavens, those three as the supports 
and firmaments of the heavens where angels are, and of the 
churches where men are : by the above, therefore, collected into 
one sense, is meant, that there would be no love, nor faith, nor 
knowledges of good and truth, remaining in the Christian 



DOCTRINE OF THE NEW CHURCH. 



49 



church, in the last time thereof, when it draws to its end. 
That the sun signifies love, has been shown in the Apocalypse 
Revealed, n. 53, 54, 41:3, 79(>, 831, 9(31 ; that the moon signi- 
fies faith, n. 53, 332, 413, 423, 533; that the stars signify 
knowledges of good and truth, n. 51, 74, 333, 408, 419, 954, 
of the same work. 

79. That, according to the above prediction, there is at this 
day so great darkness throughout the Christian churches, that 
the sun gives no light by day, nor the moon and stars any light 
by night, is occasioned solely by the doctrine of justification 
by faith alone; for it inculcates faith as the only means of 
salvation ; of the influx, progress, indwelling, operation, and 
efficacy of which no one has hitherto seen any sign ; and into 
which neither the law of the decalogue, nor charity, nor good 
works, nor repentance, nor desires after newness of life, have 
any entrance,. or are in the smallest degree connected with it; 
for it is asserted, that they spontaneously follow, without being 
of any use either to preserve faith or to procure salvation. The 
above doctrine likewise teaches, that faith alone imparts to the 
regenerate, or those who are possessed of it, full liberty, so as 
to be no longer under the law ; moreover that Christ covers 
over their sins before God the Father, who forgives them as 
though they were not seen, and crowns them with renovation, 
holiness, and eternal life. These and many other things of a 
like nature are the interiors of that doctrine ; the exteriors, 
which do not gain admission, are valuable sayings concerning 
charity, good works, acts of repentance, and exercises of the 
law ; yet these are accounted by them merely as slaves and 
drudges, which follow their mistress, faith, without being per- 
mitted to join in her company : but forasmuch as they know 
that the laity account these things as equally necessary to salva- 
tion with faith, they carefully subjoin them in their sermons and 
discourses, and pretend to conjoin them with and insert them 
into justification ; this, however, they do merely to tickle the 
ears of the vulgar, and to defend their oracles, that they may 
not appear mere riddles, or like the vain responses of sooth- 
sayers. 

80. In order to confirm the above assertions, I will adduce 
the following passages from the Formula Concordia, (concern- 
ing which see n. 9,) lest any one should think that these things 
have been unjustly laid to their charge : That the works of 
the second table of the decalogue are civil duties, and belong 
to external worship, which man is able to do of himself : and 
that it is a folly to dream that such works can justify, page 84, 

5 



go 



A BRIEF EXPOSITION OF THE 



85, 102 : that good works are to be utterly excluded from the 
business of justification by faith, p. 589, 590, 591, 704 to 708 : 
that good works do not in any wise enter into justification, p. 
589, 702. App. 62, 173 : that good works do not preserve sal- 
vation nor faith, p. 590, 705. App. p. 174 : that neither does 
repentance enter into justification by faith, p. 165, 320. App. 
p. 158 : that repentance is nothing more than praying to God, 
acknowledging the truth of the gospel, giving of thanks, being 
obedient to the magistracy, and following one's calling, p. 12, 
198. App. p. 158, 159, 172, 266: that renovation of life has 
likewise nothing to do with justification, p. 585, 685, 688, 
689. App. p. 170 : that attention to obedience for the time to 
come, in like manner, neither enters into faith, nor justifies, p. 
90, 91, 690. App. p. 167: that the regenerate are not under 
the law, but are delivered from the bondage thereof, and are 
only in the law, and under grace, p. 722, and elsewhere : that 
the sins of the regenerate are covered over by the merit of Christ, 
p. 641, 686, 687, 719, 720: besides many other passages to 
the same purport. It is to be observed, that all Protestants, 
as well those who call themselves Gospellers, as those who call 
themselves the Reformed, teach in like manner justification 
by faith alone, see above, n. 17, 18. 

81. It is a wonderful circumstance, that the doctrine of 
justification of faith alone prevails at this day over every other 
doctrine throughout all reformed Christendom, and is esteem- 
ed almost as the only important point of theology in the sacred 
order : this is what all young students among the clergy greed- 
ily learn and imbibe at the universities, and what they after- 
wards teach in the churches, and publish in print, as if they were 
inspired with heavenly wisdom, and whereby they endeavour 
to acquire to themselves a name, and the reputation of superior 
learning, as well as diplomas, licenses, and other honorary 
rewards : and these things are done, notwithstanding it is owing 
to this doctrine alone, that the sun is at this day darkened, the 
moon deprived of her light, and the stars are fallen from heaven, 
that is, have perished. It has been certified unto me, that 
the doctrine of faith in imputed righteousness has blinded the 
minds of men at this day to such a degree, that they will not, 
and therefore as it were cannot, see any divine truth by the 
light of the sun, nor by the light of the moon, but only by the 
light of a fire by night ; on which account I will venture to 
assert, that supposing divine truths concerning the conjunc- 
tion of charity and faith, concerning heaven, the Lord, and 
eternal happiness, to be sent down from heaven engraved in 



DOCTRINE OF THE NEW CHURCH. 



51 



silver characters, they would not be thought worthy to be read 
by the sticklers for justification ; but the case would be quite 
otherwise supposing a paper concerning justification by faith 
alone to be brought them from hell. It is also said in the 
Formula Concord'ur, that the article of justification by faith 
alone, or the righteousness of faith, is the chief article in the 
whole Christian doctrine ; and that the works of the law are 
utterly to be excluded from this article, p. 17, Gl, 02, 72, 89, 
683. App. p. 104. 

XIX. 

82. That they icho arc in the present justifying Faith, are 
meant by the he-goats in Daniel and in Mattlitw. 

BRIEF ANALYSIS. 

83. It is written in Daniel, " I saw in a vision a ram, which 
had two horns that irerc high, but the higher came up last ; and 
that the horn pushed westward, and northward, and southward, 
and made itself great. Then I saw a he-goat coming from the 
west, over the face o f the icholc earth, which had a horn between 
its eyes; and that he ran to the ram in the fury of his strength, 
and broke his two horns, and cast him down to the earth, and 
stamped upon him : but that the great horn of the he-goat was 
broken, and instead of it there came up four horns : and out 
of one of then came forth a little horn which waied acceding 
great towards the south, toicards the cast, and totcards the 
comeliness, and even to the host of heaven ; and it cast dmcn of 
the host and of the stars to the earth, and stamped upon them: 
yea, he magnified himself to the Prince of the host, and took from 
him the daily sacrifice, and cast away the place of his sanctuary, 
for he cast down truth to the earth. And I heard one saint 
saying, how long shall this vision be, the daily sacrifce, and 
the wasting transgression, that both the holy thing and the host 
should be given to be trodden under foot ? And he said, even 
to the evening the morning, then shedl the holy thing be justified," 
chap. viii. 2 to 14. That this vision is a prediction of the 
future states of the church, is very evident, for it declares, 
that the daily sacrifice was taken away from the Prince of the 
host, the habitation of his sanctuary cast down, and that the he- 
goat cast down truth to the earth : moreover, that a saint said, 
how long shall this vision be, that both the holy thing and the 
host should be given to be trodden under foot ; and that this 
should be even to the evening the morning, when the holy thing 



52 



A BRIEF EXPOSITION OF THE 



shall be justified : by the evening the morning is meant the 
end of the old church, when a New Church commences. 

84. In Matthew we read these words : " Then shall the 
Son of Man say to the he-goats on his left hand, depart from 
Me, for I was hungry, and ye gave Me no meat ; I was thirsty, 
and ye gave Me no drink ; I was a stranger, and ye took Me 
not in ; I was naked, and ye clothed Me not ; I was sick and 
in prison, and ye visited Me not ; and these shall go away into 
eternal punishment.'''' That the same persons are here meant 
by he-goats and sheep, as by the he-goat and ram in Daniel, 
is very evident : that by he-goats are meant those who are in 
the present justifying faith, appears from this circumstance, 
that unto the sheep are enumerated works of charity, and it is 
said that they did them ; and that unto the he-goats the same 
works of charity are enumerated, but it is said that they did 
them not, and that they are therefore sentenced to condem- 
nation : for they who are in the present justifying faith, neglect 
works, because they deny them to have any thing of salvation 
or of the church in them. When charity is thus removed, 
good works, which appertain to charity, become so totally for- 
gotten and obliterated, that they are never more remembered, 
nor is the least effort made to recall them to mind when the 
law of the decalogue is read. It is a general rule in religion, 
that in proportion as any one does not will good, and hence 
does not do it, in the same proportion he wills evils, and 
hence does them; and on the contrary, that in proportion as 
any one does not will evils, and hence does not commit them, 
in the same proportion he wills good, and hence does good; 
these latter are the sheep, but the former are the he-goats. 
If all evil persons had been there meant by the he-goats, in- 
stead of the works of charity which they had not done, the 
evils which they had done would have been enumerated. 

85. That no other than the persons above described are 
meant by the he-goats, has been manifested to me by expe- 
rience in the spiritual world ; in which world there appear all 
things that are in the natural world, such as houses and pal- 
aces, paradises and gardens, with trees of every kind; likewise 
fields and tillage lands, as also plains and green pastures, to- 
gether with flocks and herds ; and all resembling those upon 
our earth; nor is there any other difference, than that in the 
natural world they are from a natural origin, but in the spirit- 
ual world from a spiritual origin. There I have often seen 
sheep and he-goats, also combats between them, like that de- 
scribed in Daniel, chap. viii. I have seen he-goats with horns 



DOCTRINE OF THE NEW CHURCH. 



53 



bent forwards and backwards, and rushing with fury upon the 
sheep ; I have seen some he-goats with two, and others with 
four horns, with which they vehemently struck at the sheep ; 
and when I looked to discover what this meant, I saw some 
persons disputing together about faith conjoined with charity, 
and faith separated from charity; from whence it plainly ap- 
peared, that the present justifying faith, which, considered in 
itself, is a faith disjoined from charity, is the he-goat, and that 
faith conjoined with charity is the sheep. 

86. The like persons are meant by he-goats in Zechariah: 
"Mine angir was kindled against the sh<pherds, and I will 
visit t/tc he-goats," x. 3 : and in Ezekiel : " Behold I judge 
between eattle and eat tie, bt tween the rams and the he-goats ; 
seenuth it a small thing unto you, to have eaten up the good 
pasture, but ye must tread down icith your feet also the residue 
of the pastures 1 Ye thrust edl the infirm sheep with your horns, 
until ye hare dispersed tht m ; tin refore will I save My flock, 
that it be no more a prey" xxxiv. IT, 18, 22, and following 
verses. 

XX. 

87. That they who have confirmed themselves in the present 
justifying Faith, are meant in the Apoealypse by the Dragon, 
and his two Beasts, and by the Locusts; and that this same 
Faith, whin confirmed, is there meant by the great City which 
is spiritually called Sodom and Egypt, iclicrc the two Witnesses 
tverc slain, as also by the Pit of the Abyss, whence the Locusts 
came forth. 

BRIEF ANALYSIS. 

88. That seven chapters of the Apocalypse treat of the per- 
verted state of the church among the Reformed, and two chap- 
ters of the perverted state of the church among the Roman 
Catholics, and that the states of both churches, as existing at 
the present day, are sentenced to damnation,* has been shown 
i:i the explication thereof, in a work entitled, The Apocalypse 
Revealed, and that not by uncertain conjectures, but by full 
proofs. That by the dragon, treated of in the 12th chapter, 
are meant those in the Reformed churches, who make God 
three, and the Lord two, and who separate charity from faith, 



* ll is not to be supposed from hence, that all the individual members of those 
churches have incurred this dreadful sentence ; the constant testimony of our 
author is, that all with whom f'alses of doctrine are not confirmed by evil of life, 
are eventually saved. 

5* 



54 



A BRIEF EXPOSITION OF THE 



by making their faith spiritual and saving, and not charity, 
see n. 5:32 to 505, and the Memorable Relation adjoined, n. 
566. That they are further described by the two beasts, one 
rising out of the sea, and the other out of the earth, as related 
in chap. xiii. see n. 567 to 610, and the Memorable Relation, 
n. 611. That they are also described by the locusts, which 
came forth out of the pit of the abyss, as mentioned in chap, 
ix. see n. 419 to 442. That this same faith, when confirmed, 
is meant by the great city, which is spiritually called Sodom 
and Egypt, where the two faithful witnesses were slain, as re- 
lated in chap. xi. see n. 485 to 5:30, particularly n. 500 to 503, 
and the Memorable Relation, n. 531. That they are also 
meant by the pit of the abyss, out of which issued smoke as 
out of a great furnace, and the sun and the air were darkened, 
and then locusts came forth, as described in chap. ix. see n. 
421 to 424. 

89. That I might be assured and fully convinced, that by 
the pit of the abyss nothing else is meant than the faith of the 
dragon, which is a faith conceived from an idea of three Gods, 
and from having no idea of the Divinity of the Human Nature 
of Christ, and which is called faith alone justifying, regenera- 
ting, quickening, sanctifying and saving ; it was given me to 
look into that abyss, to converse with those who are therein, 
and likewise to see the locusts which came out thence; from 
which ocular demonstration, that pit, together with the abyss, 
is described by me in the Apocalypse Revealed; and because 
a description from ocular demonstration may be relied on, it 
shall be transcribed from that work, where it is described as 
follows. 

"That pit, which is like the mouth of a furnace, appears 
in the southern quarter; and the abyss beneath it is of great 
extent towards the east; they have light even there, but if 
light from heaven be let in, there is immediate darkness; 
wherefore the pit is closed up at the top. There appear in 
the abyss huts constructed of brick, which are divided into 
distinct cells, in each of which is a table, whereon lie papers, 
with some books : every one there sits at his own table, who 
in this world had confirmed justification and salvation by faith 
alone, making charity a merely natural and moral act, and the 
works thereof only works of civil life, whereby men may reap 
advantage in the world, but if done for the sake of salvation, 
they condemn them, and some even rigorously, because human 
reason and will is in them. All who are in this abyss have 
been scholars and learned men in the world ; and among them 



DOCTRINE OF THE NEW CHURCH. 



5.5 



are some metaphysicians and scholastic divines, who are there 
esteemed above the rest. But their lot is as follows : when 
first they come thither, they take tlieir seats in the first cells, 
but as they confirm faith by excluding the works of charity, 
they leave the first seats, and enter into cells nearer the east, 
and thus successively till they come towards the end, where 
they are who confirm those tenets from the Word ; and because 
they then cannot but falsify the Word, their huts vanish, and 
they find themselves in a desert. There is also an abyss be- 
neath that abyss, where those are who in like manner have 
confirmed justification and salvation by faith alone, but who 
in their spirit have denied the existence of a God, and in their 
heart have made a jest of the holy things of the church ; there 
they do nothing but quarrel, tear their garments, get upon the 
tables, stamp with their feet, and assail eacli other with re- 
proaches; and because it is not permitted them to hurt any 
one, they use threatening words, and shake their fists at each 
other." 

90. That I might also be assured and convinced, that they 
who have confirmed themselves in the present justifying faith, 
are meant by the dragon, it was given me to see many thou- 
sands of them assembled together, and they then appeared at a 
distance like a dragon with a long tail, which seemed full of 
spikes like thorns, which signified falsities. Once also there 
appeared a still greater dragon, which, raising up his back, 
lifted up his tail towards heaven, and endeavoured to draw down 
the stars from thence : stars there signify truths. 

XXI. 

91. That unless a New Church be established by the Lord, 
no one can be saved; and that this is meant by these words, 
" Unless those Days should be shortened, there should no Flesh 
be saved." Matt. xxiv. 22. 

BRIEF ANALYSIS. 

92. By shortening those days, is meant the putting an end 
to the present church, and establishing a new one ; for, as has 
been already observed, the 24th chapter of Matthew treats of 
the successive declensions and perversions of the Christian 
church, even to the consummation and end thereof, and of 
the coming of the Lord at that period. The reason why no 
flesh could be saved, unless those days should be shortened, 
is, because the faith of the present church is founded on the 



56 



A BRIEF EXPOSITION OF THE 



idea of three Gods, and with this idea no one can enter heaven; 
consequently no one can enter heaven with the faith of the 
present church, because the idea of three Gods is in all and 
every part thereof ; and besides, in that faith there exists no 
life from the works of charity : that the faith of the present 
church cannot be conjoined with charity, and produce any 
fruits which are good works, was shown above, n. 47 to 50. 
There are two things which form heaven in man, viz. the truths 
of faith and the goods of charity ; the truths of faith occasion 
the presence of the Lord, and point out the way to heaven, and 
the goods of charity effect conjunction with the Lord, and 
introduce into heaven; and everyone is there introduced into 
light according to his affection of truth, and into heat accord- 
ing to his affection of good : that the affection of truth is faith 
in its essence, and the affection of good charity in its essence, 
and that the marriage of them both constitutes the church, 
may be seen above, n. 48 ; the church and heaven make one. 
That these three are not in the churches of the present day, 
which are built upon faith alone, has been fully shown in the 
preceding pages. 

93. I have sometimes, in the spiritual world, conversed with 
the maintainers of justification by faith alone, and have told 
them that their doctrine is erroneous, and likewise absurd, 
that it brings on security, blindness, sleep, and night, in spirit- 
ual things, and thereby death to the soul, thus exhorting them 
to desist from it. But I have received for answer, Why should 
we desist? Does not the pre-eminence of the clergy above the 
laity, in point of erudition, depend upon this doctrine? To 
which I replied, that it should seem from hence, that they re- 
garded not so much the salvation of souls, as their own pre- 
eminence ; and that because they had applied the truths of 
the Word to confirm their own false principles, and thereby 
had adulterated them, they were become angels of the abyss, 
called Abaddons and Apollyons, Apoc. ix. 11 ; by whom are 
signified the destroyers of the church by a total falsification of 
the Word : see the explication thereof, n. 440, and the Memor- 
able Relation, n. 566, in the Apocalypse Revealed. But they 
answered, How can this be ? Are we not, by our knowledge of 
the mysteries of that doctrine, oracles ? And do we not from 
that doctrine give answers as from our sanctuary ? wherefore 
we are not Apollyons, but Apollos. On hearing this, I replied 
with indignation, If ye are Apollos, ye are also Leviathans, 
the first class of you are crooked Leviathans, and the second 
class of you are oblong Leviathans, whom God will visit with his 



DOCTRINE OF THE NEW CHURCH. 



sharp and great sword, Isaiah xxvii. 1 : but they laughed at 
these words. What is meant by being visited and perishing 
by the sword, may be seen in the Apocalypse Revealed, n, 52. 

94. The great arcanum, why, unless a New Church be es- 
tablished by the Lord, no flesh can be saved, is this; that as 
long as the dragon with his crew remains in the world of spirits, 
into w hich he was cast from heaven, so long no divine truth, 
united with divine good, can pass from the Lord to men on 
earth, but it is either annihilated or perverted, so that salvation 
is thereby rendered impossible to be attained : this is what is 
meant in the Apocalypse by the following passage : " And the 
dragon was cast out into the earth, and his angels ire re cast 
out with him : woe to the inhabitants of the earth and the sea, 
for the devil is conic down unto them, having great wrath; and 
he persecuted the woman, who brought forth a Son," chap. xii. 

9, 12, 13 : but after the dragon was cast into hell, chap. xx. 

10, then it was that John saw the New Heaven and the New 
Earth, and saw the New Holy Jerusalem coming down from 
God out of heaven, Apoc. xxi. 1, 2, &c. "What is meant by 
the dragon, and who the dragons are, may be seen above, 
n. 47. 

XXII. 

95. That the Opening and Rejection of the Tenets of the 
Faith of the present Church, and the Rt relation and Recep- 
tion of the Tenets of tin Faith of the New Church, is meant 
by these words in the Apocalypse: "He that sat upon the 
throne said, Behold I will make all things New ; and He 
said unto me, Write, for these Words arc true and faithful," 
chap. xxi. 5. 

BRIEF ANALYSIS. 

96. He that sat upon the throne, that is, the Lord, said 
these things unto John, when he saw the New Jerusalem 
coming down from God out of heaven : that by the New 
Jerusalem is meant a New Church, will be shown in the fol- 
lowing chapter. The reason why the falsities of the tenets 
of the faith of the present church must first be opened and 
rejected, before the truths of the tenets of the New Church 
can be revealed and received, is, because they do not agree 
together, no, not in one single point or particular ; for the ten- 
ets of the present church are founded upon a faith, in which, 
whether there be any essential of the church, or not, is un- 
known : now the essentials of the church, which conjoin them- 



58 



A BRIEF EXPOSITION OF THE 



selves with a faith directed to one God, are charity, good works, 
repentance, and a life according to the divine laws; and for- 
asmuch as these together with faith affect and move the human 
will and thought, they conjoin man to the Lord, and the Lord 
to man : since therefore none of these essentials enter into the 
faith of the present church at the time it takes place, which is 
called the act of justification, it cannot possihly be known 
whether this faith be in man, or not, consequently whether 
it be any thing, or only an idea of something ; for they say, 
that man in the act of justification is like a stock or a stone, 
and that he can neither will, think, co-operate, no, nor even 
apply or accommodate himself to the reception thereof in the 
smallest degree, see above, n. 15, (<) ( d ) : since therefore the 
case is such, that no one can guess, much less know, whether 
that faith be in him, and thus whether it be in him like a 
painted flower, or like a flower growing in a field ; or whether 
it be like a bird flying by him, or like a bird that hath built her 
nest in him ; I ask by what tokens or signs is this to be known? 
If it be answered, that it is to be known by charity, good works, 
repentance, and exercises of the law, which follow after this 
faith, and yet have no connection with it ; I leave it to men 
of sense to determine, whether things, that have no connec- 
tion with faith, can possibly be proper signs and evidences 
thereof; for this faith of theirs, they say, is neither preserv- 
ed nor retained by the above-mentioned works of charity, 
see above, n. 12, ("') ("). From what has been said we may 
draw the following conclusion, viz. that in the faith of the 
present day there exists nothing of the church, and conse- 
quently that it is not any thing, but only an idea of some- 
thing : since then this faith is of such a nature, it is deserv- 
edly to be rejected, yea, it rejects itself, as a thing that bears 
no relation to a church. 

97. But widely different is the case with the tenets or doc- 
trinals of the New Church; these are all essentials, in each 
whereof there is heaven and the church ; and they regard this 
as their end, viz. that man may be in the Lord, and the Lord 
in man, according to His own words in John, chap. xiv. 20 ; 
and chap. xv. 4, 5, 6 : it is this conjunction alone which con- 
stitutes the Christian Church. From these iew observations 
it may clearly appear, what is meant by these words of the 
Lord : " He that sat upon the throne said, Behold I will make 
all things New; and He said, Write, for these Words are true 
and faith fid ." 

98. The sole reason why the Christian world has fallen 



DOCTRINE OF THE NEW CHURCH. 



59 



into a faith, which has put away from itself all the truths and 
goods of heaven and the church, even to the separation there- 
of, is, because they have divided God into three persons, and 
have not believed the Lord God the Saviour to he one with 
God the Father, and thus have not approached Him immedi- 
ately ; when nevertheless He alone as to His Humanity is 
essential Divine Truth, "which is the Word, which was God 
with God, and is the true Light which cn/ighfencfh every man; 
and became flesh," John i. I, '2, 9, 14. That He is essential 
truth, and thus essential light, is also testified in other places ; 
for He saith, "I am the Light of the world" John viii. 22. 
chap. ix. 5 : and in another place : " While ye have the Light, 
believe in the Light, that ye may be the children of Light: I 
am come a Light into the world, that whosoever believeth 
in Me, may not abide in darkness," John xii. 36, 40: in the 
Apocalypse : " J am Alpha and Omega, the Jit ginning and the 
End, the First and the Last, the Bright and Morning Star," 
chap. xxii. 13, 16: and in Matthew: " When Jesus urns trans- 
formed, His face shone as the sun, and His raiment became as 
the light," chap. xvii. 12. Hence it appears why and whence 
this imaginary faith came into the world, namely, because 
they have not approached the Lord ; and I can, from all my 
experience, as well as from positive assurance from heaven, 
with the utmost certainty declare, that it is impossible to de- 
rive a single genuine theological truth from any other source 
than from the Lord alone ; nay, that to derive it from any other 
source is as impossible, as it is to sail from England or Hol- 
land to the Pleiades, or to ride on horseback from Germany to 
Orion in the sky. 

XXIII. 

99. That the New Church about to be established by the 
Lord, is the New Jerusalem, treated of in the Apocalypse, 
chap. xxi. and xxii. which is there called the Bride and the 
Wife of the Lamb. 

BRIEF ANALYSIS. 

100. The reason why the New Church is meant by the 
New Jerusalem coming down from God out of heaven, Apoc. 
xxi. is, because Jerusalem was the metropolis of the land of 
Canaan, and therein was the temple and the altar, and there 
also the sacrifices were offered, consequently divine worship 
was there performed, which every male throughout the land 
was required to attend three times a year. A further reason 



no 



A BRIEF EXPOSITION OF THE 



is, because the Lord was in Jerusalem, and taught in its temple, 
and afterwards glorified His Humanity there ; hence it is, that 
by Jerusalem is signified the church. That by Jerusalem is 
meant the church, is very clear from the prophecies in the 
Old Testament concerning a New Church to be established 
by the Lord, wherein it is called Jerusalem. I shall only ad- 
duce the following passages, from which any one of interior 
reason may see, that by Jerusalem is meant the church. 
"Behold I create a new heaven and a new earth, and tin "for- 
mer shall not be remembered ; beheld I will create Jirusalem an 
exultation, and her people a gladness, that I may exult over 
Jerusalem, and be glad over My people. Then the wolf and 
the lamb shall feed together : they shall not do evil in all the 
mountain of My holiness" Isaiah lxv. 17, 18, 19, 25. " For 
Zion's sake I will not be silent, and for Jerusalem's sake I 
will not rest, until her righteousness goeth forth as splendour, 
and her salvation as a lamp that burnetii. Then the Gentiles 
shall see thy righteousness, and all kings thy glory; and thou 
shalt be called by a new name, which the mouth of Jehovah 
shall utter; and thou skalt be a crown of beauty, and a diadem of 
a kingdom, in the hand of thy God: Jehovah shall be well plcefsed 
in thee, and thy land shall be married. Behold thy salvation 
shall come, behold His reward is with Him : and they shall 
call them, the people of holiness, the redeemed of Jehovah ; and 
thou shalt be called, a city sought out, not deserted," Isaiah 
lxii. 1 to 4, 11, 12. "Awake, awake, put on thy strength, O 
Zion, put on the garments of thy beauty, O Jerusalem, the city 
of holiness ; for henceforth there shall no more come into thee 
the uncircumciscd and the unclean. ; shake thyself from the dust, 
arise, sit down, O Jerusalem. The people shall know My name 
in that day ; for I am He that doth speak, behold it is I: Je- 
hovah hath comforted His people, He hath redeemed Jerusa- 
lem," Isaiah Hi, 1, 2, 0, 9. " Shout with joy, O daughter of 
Zion, be glad with all thy heart, O daughter of Jerusalem ; 
the king of Israel is in the midst of thee ; fear not evil any 
more ; he will be glad over thee with joy, he will rest in thy love, 
lie will rejoice over thee with shouting ; I will make you a name 
and a praise among all the people of the earth," Zeph. iii. 14 
to 17, 20. " Thus saith Jchovcdi thy Redeemer, saying to 
Jerusalem, Thou shalt be inhabited," Isaiah xliv. 24, 26. 
" Thus saith Jehovah, I will return to Zion, and dwell in 
the midst of Jerusalem, whence Jerusalem shall be called the 
city of truth, and the mountedn of Jehovah Zebaoth the moun- 
tain of holiness," Zech. viii. 3, 20, to 23. " Then shall ye 



DOCTRINE OF THE NEW CHURCH. 



01 



know, that I am Jehovah your God, dwelling in Zion, the 
mountain of holiness, and Jerusalem shall be holiness ; audit 
shall come to pass in that day, that the mountains shall drop 
down with new wine, and the kills shall flow with milk, and 
Jerusalem shall sit fast from generation to generation," Joel iv. 
17 to 21. "In that day shall the branch of Jehovah be beauty 
and glory ; audit shall come to pass, that he that is left in Zion, 
and he that remaineth in Jerusalem, shall be called holy, every 
one that is written for life in Jerusalem," Isaiah iv. 2, 3. "In 
the last days the mountain of the house of Jehovah shall be estab- 
lished as the head of the mountains, for out of Zion shall go forth 
doctrine, and the word o f Jehovah from Jerusalem," Micah iv. 
1, 2, 8. "At that time they shall call Jerusalem the throne oj 
Jehovah, and all nations shall be gathered to Jerusalem for the 
name of Jehovah, neither shall they go any more after the con- 
firmation of their own evil heart," Jer. iii. 17. " Look upon 
Zion, the city of our stated feasts, let thine eyes see Jerusalem 
a quiet habitation, a tabernacle that shall not be taken down; 
the nails thereof shall never be removed, and the cords thereof 
shall not be broken," Isaiah xxxiii. 20 ; not to mention other 
passages, as Isaiah xxiv. 3. chap xxxvii. 32. chap. lxvi. 10 to 
14. Zech. xii. 3, 6 to 10. chap. xiv. 8, 11, 12, 21. Malachi 
iii. 2, 4. Psalm exxii. 1 to 7. Psalm exxx. 4, 5, 6. That 
by Jerusalem in the above passages is meant a church to bo 
established by the Lord, and not the Jerusalem inhabited by 
the Jews, is plain from every particular of its description there- 
in ; as that Jehovah God was about to create a new heaven 
and a new earth, and also a Jerusalem at the same time ; and 
that this Jerusalem would be a crown of beauty, and a diadem 
of a kingdom ; that it is to be called holiness, and the city of 
truth, the throne of Jehovah, a quiet habitation, a tabernacle 
that shall not be taken down ; that the wolf and the lamb shall 
fee ! together therein, and that the mountains shall drop down 
with new wine, and the hills flow with milk, and that it should 
remain from generation to generation ; besides other circum- 
stances, as respecting the people therein, that they should be 
holy, all written for life, and should be called the redeemed 
of Jehovah. Moreover all those passages treat of the coming 
of the Lord, and particularly of His second coming, when 
Jerusalem shall be such as is there described ; for heretofore 
she has not been married, that is, has not been the bride and 
the wife of the Lamb, as the New Jerusalem is said to be in 
the Apocalypse. The former or present church is meant by 
Jerusalem in Daniel, and its commencement is there describ- 
G 



02 



A BRIEF EXPOSITION OF THE 



ed in these words : " Know therefore and understand, that 
from the going forth of the word, unto the restoring arid build- 
ing of Jerusalem, even unto Messiah the Prince, shall be seven 
weeks ; afterwards in sixty and two weeks it shall be restored, 
and the street and the ditch shall be built, but in distress of 
times," chap. ix. 25 : but its end is described by these words : 
" At length upon the bird of abominations shall be desolation, 
and even to the consummation and decision it shall drop upon 
the devastation," verse 27 : this last passage is alluded to in 
the following words of the Lord in Matthew : " When ye shall 
see the abomination of desolation foretold by Daniel the prophet, 
standing in the holy place, let him. that rcadeth note it well," 
chap. xxiv. 15. That by Jerusalem, in the places above ad- 
duced, is not meant the Jerusalem inhabited by the Jews, 
may appear from those places in the Word, where it is said 
of that city, that it was entirely destroyed, and that it was to 
be destroyed, as in Jer. v. 1. chap. vi. 7. chap. vii. 17, 18, 
&c. chap. viii. 6, 7, 8, &.c. chap. ix. 10, 11, 13, &lc. chap, 
xiii. 9, 10, 14. chap. xiv. 16. Lament, i. 8, 9, 17. Ezech. iv. 
1 to the end. chap. v. 9 to the end. chap. xii. 18, 19. chap, 
xv. 6, 7, 8. chap. xvi. 1 to 63. chap, xxiii. 1 to 40. Matt, xxiii. 
37, 38. Luke xix. 41 to 44. chap. xxi. 20,21, 22. chap, xxiii. 
28, 29, 30 ; besides many other passages ; and also where it 
is called Sodom, as in Isa. iii. 9. Jer. xxiii. 14. Ezech. xvi. 
46, 48 ; and in other places. 

101. That the church is the Lord's, and that by virtue of 
a spiritual marriage, which is that of good and truth, the 
Lord is called the Bridegroom and the Husband, and the 
church the bride and the wife, is known among Christians 
from the Word, particularly from the following passages : 
John said of the Lord, "He that hath the bride is the Bride- 
groom, but the friend of the Bridegroom is he who standcth and 
heareth Him, and rcjoiccth because of the Bridegroom's voice," 
John iii. 29: "Jesus said, while the Bridegroom is ivith them, 
the children of the marriage cannot fast," Matt. ix. 15. Mark 
ii. 19, 20. Luke v. 34, 35 : " I saio the holy city New Jeru- 
salem coming down from God out of heaven, prepared as a 
bride adorned for her husband," Apoc. xxi. 2. " The angel 
said unto John, come and I will show thee the bride, the Jamb's 
wife, and from a mountain he showed him the holy city Jeru- 
salem," Apoc. xxi. 9 : " The time of the marriage, of the Lamb 
is come, and His wife hath made herself ready ; blessed are. 
they who are called unto the marriage supper of the Jamb," 
Apoc. xix. 7,9:1 am the Root and Offspring of David, the 



DOCTRINE OF THE NEW CHUnCH. 



63 



Bright and Morning Star : the spirit and the bride say, Come; 
and let him who hcareth say, Come ; and him that is athirst, 
Let him come ; and whosoever tcill, let him take the water of life 
freely ," Apoc xxii. 16, 17. 

XXIV. 

102. That the Faith of the New Church cannot by any 
means be together with the Faith of the former Church, and 
that in case they be together, such a collision and conflict will 
ensue, as to destroy every thing relating to the Church in man. 

BRIEF ANALYSIS. 

103. The reason why the faith of the New Church cannot 
by any means be together with the faith of the former or 
present church, is, because they do not agree together in one 
third, no uor even in one tenth part. The faith of the former 
church is described in the Apocalypse, chap. xii. by the dragon, 
but the faith of the New Church by the woman surrounded 
with the sun, having upon her head a crown of twelve stars, 
whom the dragon persecuted, and at whom he cast water as a 
flood, that he might swallow her up, see above, n. 87 to 90 ; 
these two cannot be together in one city, much less in one 
house, consequently they cannot be together in one mind; or 
should they be together, the unavoidable consequence must 
be, that the woman would be continually exposed to the rage 
and insanity of the dragon, and in fear lest he should devour 
her son ; for it is said in the Apocalypse, chap. xii. that the 
dragon stood before the woman who was ready to be delivered, 
in order to devour her child, and that the woman, after she 
had brought forth the man-child, fled into the desert, verses 
1, 4, 6, 14 to 17. The faith of the former church is a faith of 
the night, for human reason has no perception of it, where- 
fore it is also said, that the understanding must be kept in 
obedience thereunto : nay, it is not even known whether it be 
within man or without him, because nothing of man's will and 
reason enters into it, no, nor charity, good works, repentance, 
the law of the decalogue, with many other things which really 
exist in the mind of man ; that this is the case, may be seen 
above, n. 79, 80, 90, 97, 93 : but the faith of the New Church 
enters into a conjugial covenant with all these, and conjoins 
itself to them; and being thus in the heat of heaven, it is also 
in the light thereof, and is a faith of light : now a faith of night 
and a faith of light can no more be together, than an owl and 



A BRIEF EXFOSITIO?: OF THE 



a dove in one nest ; for in such case the owl would lay her 
eggs, and the dove hers, and after sitting, the young of both 
would be hatched, and then the owl would tear in pieces the 
young of the dove, and would give them to her own young for 
food ; for an owl is a bird of prey. There is a further reason 
why the faith of the former church and the faith of the New 
Church cannot possibly be together, and that is, because they 
are heterogeneouo [or diametrically opposite to each other in 
their nature and quality] ; for the faith of the former church 
springs from an idea of three Gods, see n. 30 to 38, but the 
faith of the New Church from the idea of one God ; and as 
there hence arises a heterogeneity or repugnance to each other, 
there must inevitably, supposing them to be together, be such 
a collision and conflict, as would prove fatal to every thing 
relating to the church ; or, in other words, man would either 
fall into a delirium, or into a state of insensibility as to spirit- 
ual things, until at length he would scarcely know what the 
church is, or whether there be any church at all. From what 
has been said it follows, that they who have confirmed them- 
selves in the faith of the old church, cannot, without endanger- 
ing their spiritual life, embrace the faith of the New Church, 
until they first have narrowly examined, rejected, and thus 
extirpated the former faith, together with its young or eggs, 
that is to say, its tenets ; the true nature or quality of which 
has been already shown in the foregoing pages, particularly 
at n. 64 to G9. 

104. The like would happen if a person should embrace 
the faith of the New Church, and retain the faith of the old 
church concerning the imputation of the righteousness or 
merit of the Lord ; for from this, as from their root, all the 
tenets of the former church, like so many young shoots, have 
sprung forth. Supposing this to be the case, it would com- 
paratively be like a person extricating himself from three heads 
of the dragon, and becoming entangled in his four remain- 
ing ones ; or like a person dying from a leopard, and meeting 
with a lion ; or like a person escaping out of a pit where 
there is no water, and falling into a pit full of water, and 
being drowned. That this is the case, will be seen after the 
exposition of the following lemma, where something will be 
advanced concerning imputation. 

XXV. 

105. That the Roman Catholics at this day know nothing 
the Imputation of the Merit of Christ, and of Justification 



DOCTRINE OF Tlin NEW Clll'RCir. 



63 



by Faith therein, into which their Church icas formerly ini- 
tiated, because it is entirely concealed under their external 
Forms of Worship, which are numerous ; for which reason, 
therefore, if they recede but in part from their external Forms 
of Worship, and immediately approach God tho Saviour Jesus 
Christ, and administer the Holy Eucharist in both kinds, 
hey may be brought Into the New Jerusalem, or the New 
Church of the Lord more easily than the Reformed. 

BRIEF ANALYSIS. 

10G. That the primates and rulers of the Romish Church, 
at their consecration to the ministry, swear to observe the de- 
crees of the council of Trent, appears from the bull of Pope 
Pius IV. where, in the form of the oath of their profession 
of faith, dated the 13th of November, 15G4, we find these 
words : " I firmly believe and profess all and every thing con- 
tained in the creed used by the holy Church of Home ; and I 
receive without any doubt all such things as are maintained and 
eh eli/red in her holy canons, and general councils, and espe- 
cially by the most holy council of Trent ; so help me God.'" 
That they also bind themselves by an oath to believe and 
profess what the council of Trent has established, concern- 
ing the imputation of the merit of Christ, and justification 
by faith therein, is evident from these words in the same bull : 
" / embrace and receive all and every thing, which has been 
determined and declared in the most holy council of Trent, 
concerning original sin and justification what these are, 
may be seen from the extracts taken from that council, as 
above, n. 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. From these principles established 
in that council, the following consequences have been drawn, 
namely, " That the Roman Catholics, previous to the refor- 
mation, held precisely the same doctrines as the Reformed 
have done subsequent thereto, with respect to the imputation 
of the merit of Christ, and justification by faith therein, only 
with this difference, that they conjoined the same faitli with 
charity and good works," see above, n. 19, 20 : also, " That 
the leading Reformers, Luther, Melancthon, and Calvin, re- 
tained all the tenets concerning imputation of the merit of 
Christ, and justification by faith, just as they then were and 
had been held by the Roman Catholics ; but that they separa- 
ted charity and good works from that faith, and declared them 
to have no saving efficacy, to the intent that they might be 
severed from the Roman Catholics, as to the very essentials 



A ERIEF EXPOriTlON OF THE 



of the church, fMch are fuuh and charity," see above n. 21, 
22, 23 : moreover, " That, neve-theless, the aforesaid leading 
Reformers adjoined good works, and even conjoined them, 
to their faith, but at the same time considered man as a passive 
subject ; whereas the Roman Catholic- regarded him as an 
active subject ; and that after all there actually is a conform- 
ity of sen iment between both the one and the other, as to 
faith, works, and merits," see above, n. 24 to 29. From 
what has been shown, then, it is evident, that this faith is a 
faith which the Roman Catholics swear to observe, equally 
as well as the Reformed. 

107. Nevertheless this faith is so far obliterated among the 
Roman Catholics at this day, that they scarcely know a sylla- 
ble about it ; not that it has been reprobated by any papal 
decree, but because it has been concealed by the externals 
of worship, such as the adoration of Christ's vicar, the invo- 
cation of saints, the veneration of images, and moreover by 
such tilings as. from being accounted holy, affect the senses, 
as masses in ai unknown tongue, garments, lights, incense, 
pompous processions ; also mysteries respecting the eucharist ; 
by these things and others of a like nature, faith justifying by 
the imputation of the merit of Christ, although a primitive 
tenet of the Romish Church, has been so removed out of 
sight, and withdrawn from the memory, that it is like something 
buried in the earth, and covered over with a stone, which the 
monks have set a watch over, to prevent its being dug up and 
revived ; for were it revived, the belief of their possessing 
a supernatural power of forgiving sins, and thus of justifying, 
sanctifying, and bestowing salvation, would cease, and there- 
with all their sanctity, pre-eminence, and prodigious gains. 

108. The first reason why the Roman Catholics may be 
brought into the New Jerusalem, or New Church, more 
easily than the Reformed, is, because the faith of justifica- 
tion by the imputation of the merit of Christ, which is an 
erroneous faith, and cannot be together with the faith of 
the New Chun h, (see a. 102 to 104,) is with them obliterated, 
and is like to De still more fully so ; whereas it is as it were 
engraven upon the Reformed, inasmuch as it is the principal 
tenet of their church. A second reason is, because the Ro- 
man Catholics entertain an idea of divine majesty belonging 
to the Humanity of the Lord, more than the Reformed do, 
as is evident from their most devout veneration of the host. 
A th % rd reason is, because they hold charity, good works, 
repojtance, and attrition to amendment of life, to be essen- 



DOCTRINE OF THE NEW CHURCH. 



CI 



uals of salvation, and these are also essentials of the New 
Church ; but the case is otherwise with the Reformed, who 
are confirmed in faith alone ; with these the above are 
neither regarded as essentials nor formalities belonging to 
faith, and consequently as not at all contributing to salvation. 
These are three reasons, why the Roman Catholics, if they 
approach God the Saviour Himself, not mediately but im- 
mediately, and likewise administer the holy eucharist in 
both kinds, may more easily than the Reformed receive a 
living faith in the room of a dead faith, and be conducted 
by angels from the Lord to the gates of the New Jerusalem 
or New Church, and be introduced therein with joy and 
shouting. 



109. The imputation of the righteousness or merits of 
Christ, enters at this day like a soul into the whole system of 
theology throughout the Reformed Christian world : it is from 
imputation that faith, which is therein accounted the only- 
medium of salvation, is affirmed to be righteousness before 
God, see above, n. 11, ( d ) ; and it is from imputation that man, 
by means of that faith, is said to be clothed with the gifts of 
righteousness, as a king when elected is invested with the in- 
signia of royalty. But, nevertheless, imputation, from the mere 
assertion that a man is righteous, effects nothing, for it passes 
only into the ears, and does not operate in man, unless the 
imputation of righteousness be also the application of righteous- 
ness by its being communicated and so induced ; this follows 
from its effects, which are said to be the remission of sins, re- 
generation, renovation, sanctification, and accordingly salva- 
tion : it is asserted further, that by means of that faith Christ 
dwells in man, the Holy Spirit operates in him, and that hence 
the regenerate are not only called righteous, but arc in reality 
such : that not only the gifts of God, but likewise Christ Him- 
self, yea, all the Holy Trinity, dwells by faith in the regenerate, 
as in their temples, sec above, n. 15, (') ; and that man, both in 
regard to person and works, is righteous, and pronounced to be 
so, see above, n. 14, ( u ) : from which it clearly follows, that by 
the imputation of Christ's righteousness is meant its applica- 
tion, and thereby its being induced, by virtue of which man is 
made partaker thereof. Now as imputation is the root, the 
beginning, and the foundation of faith, and all its operations 
towards salvation, and hence is as it were the sanctuary or 
sacred recess in the Christian temples at this day, it is necessary 
to subjoin here something relative to Imputation by way of 



OS 



A BUIEF EXPOSITION OF THE 



corollary : but this shall be distinctly arranged under proper 
articles in the following order : I. That to every one after 
death is imputed the evil in which he is, and in like manner 
the good. II. That the induction or translation of the good 
of one person into another, is a thing impossible. III. That 
a faith of the imputation or application of the righteousness 
or merits of Christ, is, inasmuch as such imputation or ap- 
plication is impossible, an imaginary faith. 

1 10. I. That to every one after (hath is imputed the Evil in 
which he is, and in like manner the Good. In order to illus- 
trate this with some degree of evidence, it shall be considered 
under the following distinctions, I. That every one has a 
proper life of his own. 2. That the life of every one remains 
with him after death. 3. That to the evil person is then im- 
puted the evil of his life, and that to the good person is im- 
puted the good of his life. First, That every one ha* a proper 
life of his own, consequently a life distinct from that of an- 
other, is well known : for there is a perpetual variety, and no 
two things are alike ; hence it is that every one has a property 
that is peculiarly his own : this manifestly appears from the 
faces of men, there not being one face exactly like another, 
nor ever can be to eternity, because there do not exist two minds 
alike, and the face is from the mind, for it is, as usually de- 
nominated, the type or index of the mind, and the mind de- 
rives its origin and form from the life. Unless a man had a 
proper life of his own, as he has a mind and face of his own, 
he could not enjoy any life after death distinct from that of 
another ; nay, heaven could not exist, for this consists of a per- 
petual variety arising from the distinct life of each individual; 
its form solely proceeds from the variety of souls and minds 
disposed into such an order, as to constitute one whole ; and 
they constitute one from that One, whose life is in the whole 
and in every particular there, as the soul is in man : unless 
this were the case, heaven would be dispersed, because its 
form would be dissolved. The One from whom the life of ail 
and every one proceeds, and from whom that form coheres 
together, is the Lord. Secondly, That the life of (very 
one remaineth with him after (hath, is known in the church 
from the Word, and particularly from the following passages : 
" The Son of man shall come, and then he shall render unto 
everyone according to his deeds," Matt. xvi. 27. "I saw 
the books opened, and all were judged according to their 
works," Apoc. xxi. 12, 13. " In the day of judgment God will 
render unto every one according to his works," Rom. ii. G. 
2 Corinth, v. 10. The works, according to which it shall be 



DOCTRINE OF THE NEW CHURCH. 



60 



rendered unto every one, are the life, for the life effects them, 
and they are according to llic life. Forasmuch as it has been 
granted nie for many years past to be in consort with angels, 
and to converse with those who have departed from the world, 
I can testify as a matter of certainty, that every one is there 
examined as to the quality of his past life, and that the 
life which lie had contracted in the world, abides with him to 
eternity : I have spoken with those, who lived many ages ago, 
whose life I was acquainted with from history, and I found 
them to be similar in quality to the description given of them: 
I have also heard from the angels, that no one's life can be 
changed after death, because it is organized accord ir.g to his love 
and faith, and hence according to his works ; and that if the life 
were changed, the organization would be destroyed, which 
never can be done : they further added, that a change of 
organization can only take place in the material body, and by 
no means in the spiritual body, after the former is rejected. 
Thirdly, That to the evil person is then imputed the evil of his 
life, and that to the good person is imputed the good thereof. 
The imputation of evil, after death, does not consist in accusa- 
tion, blame, censure, or in passing judgment, as in the world; 
but the evil itself effects this: for the wicked, of their own 
accord, separate themselves from the good, because they can- 
not be together ; the delights of the love of evil are in aversion 
to the delights of the love of good, and delights exhale from 
every one, as odours from every vegetable on earth ; for they 
are no longer absorbed and concealed by the material body, as 
before, but have a free efflux into the spiritual atmosphere 
from their loves ; and inasmuch as evil is there perceived as it 
were in its odour, it is this which accuses, blames, finds guilty, 
and judges ; not before any particular judge, but before every 
one who is in good ; and this is what is meant by imputation. 
The imputation of good is effected in the same manner, and 
takes place with those, who in the world had acknowledged, 
that every good in them was and is from the Lord, and nothing 
thereof from themselves : these, after preparation, are let into 
the interior delights of their own good, and then a way is open- 
ed for them towards a society in heaven, whose delights are 
homogeneous : this is done by the Lord. 

111. II. That the Induetion or Translation of the Good 
of one Person to another, is a thing impossible. The proof 
hereof may also appear from the following observations in 
their order: 1. That every man is born in evil. 2. That 
man is led into good through regeneration by the Lord. 3. 



70 



A BRIEF EXPOSITION OF THE 



That this is effected by faith in the Lord, and by a life accord- 
ing to His commandments. 4. Wherefore the good of one 
person cannot by application he transferred to another, and so 
imputed. First, That every man is born in evil, is known in 
the church. This evil is said to be hereditary from Adam ; 
but it is from parents, from whom every one derives his natural 
disposition, or inclination ; which is a fact proved both by 
reason and experience ; for the likenesses of parents may be 
traced in the faces, characters, and manners of their children, 
and their children's children ; hence families are distinguish- 
ed by many, and their propensities are also judged of ; where- 
fore the evils, which parents have contracted, are transmitted 
by propagation to their posterity, and manifest themselves by 
a certain inclination towards them ; hence are derived the evils 
into which men are bom. Secondly, That man is led into 
good through regeneration by the Lord. That there is such 
a thing as regeneration, and that unless a person is regenerat- 
ed, he cannot enter into heaven, is very evident from the Lord's 
words in John iii. 3, 5. That regeneration is purification from 
evils, and thus renovation of life, the Christian world cannot 
be ignorant of, for it is even discerned by reason, whilst it 
acknowledges that every one is born in evil, and that evil can- 
not be washed and wiped away, like filth, by soap and water, 
but by repentance. Thirdly, That this is effected by faith in 
the Lord, and by a life according to His commandments. The 
precepts of regeneration are five, as may be seen above, n. 43, 
44 ; among which are these : That evils ought to be shunned, 
because they are of the devil and from the devil ; that good 
actions ought to be done, because they are of God and from 
God ; and that the Lord is to be approached, that He may lead 
us so to do. Let every one consider and weigh with himself, 
whether good can be derived to man from any other source ; and 
if he is not possessed of good he cannot be saved. Fourthly, 
Wherefore, the good of one person cannot by application be 
transferred to another, and so imputed. From what has been 
said above, it follows, that man by regeneration is renewed as 
to his spirit, and that this is effected by faith in the Lord, 
accompanied by a life according to His commandments : who 
does not see, that this renewal can only be effected pro- 
gressively ; nearly in like manner as a tree takes root, and 
grows successively from a seed, and comes to perfection? 
They who have a different notion of regeneration and reno- 
vation, know nothing of the state of man, nor any thing about 
evil and good, as that they are diametrically opposite to each 



DOCTRINE OF THE NEW CHURCH. 



71 



other, and that good cannot be implanted but in proportion as 
evil is removed ; neither do they know, that so long as any one 
is in evil, he is averse to what is really good ; wherefore, it* the 
good of one person were to be applied and so transferred to 
another who is in evil, it would be like casting a lamb to a 
wolf, or fastening a pearl to a hog's snout. From what has 
been said, it is evident, that the induction or translation of 
the good of one person into another is a thing impossible. 

11'2. III. TJiat the Faith of Imputation or Application of 
the Righteousness or Merits of Christ, is, inasmuch as such 
Imputation or Application is impossible, an imaginary Faith. 
That to every one is imputed the evil in which he is, and in 
like manner the good, was demonstrated above, n. 110: hence 
it is evident, that if by imputation is meant the application, 
and thereby the translation, of the good of one person to an- 
other, it is a mere creature of the imagination. In the world, 
merits may be as it were transcribed by men, that is, benefits 
may be conferred on children for the sake of their parents, or 
on the friends of any favourite ; yet the good of merit cannot 
be inscribed on their souls, but only externally adjoined : the 
like cannot take place with men in respect to their spiritual 
life : this, as was shown above, must be implanted, and if not 
implanted by a life according to the fore-mentioned precepts 
of the Lord, man remains in the evil in which he was born ; 
until this is brought to pass, no good can approach him, or, if 
it does, it is instantly repelled, and rebounds like an elastic ball 
falling on a stone, or is absorbed like a diamond thrown into 
a bog. An unreformed man is, as to his spirit, like a panther, 
or an owl, and may be compared to a thorn or a nettle ; but a 
regenerate man is like a sheep or a dove, and may be com- 
pared to an olive-tree or a vine ; consider, then, I pray, if thou 
art disposed, how can a man-panther be converted into a man- 
sheep, or an owl into a dove, or a thorn into an olive-tree, or 
a nettle into a vine, by any imputation, if thereby is meant 
transcription ? In order that conversion may take place, 
must not the ferocious nature of the panther and the owl, and 
the noxious properties of the thorn and the nettle, be first re- 
moved, and thus the truly human and inoffensive properties be 
implanted ? By what means this is effected, the Lord also 
teaches in John, chap. xv. 1 to 7. 

113. To the above shall be added the following observa- 
tions. It is said in the church, that none can fulfill the law, 
especially since whosoever offends against one command- 
ment of the decalogue, offends against all. This form of 



A BRIEF EXPOSITION OF THE 



speaking, however, is to be taken in a different sense from 
what it seems to convey ; for it is to be understood in this 
manner, that whosoever, from purpose [of the will] or from 
confirmation [of the understanding], acts in opposition to one 
commandment, acts in opposition to the rest, inasmuch as to 
act thus from purpose or from confirmation is to deny that 
any thing is a sin, and he who is guilty of such denial of sin, 
makes light of acting against all the rest of the commandments. 
Who does not know, that he who is a fornicator, is not there- 
fore a murderer, a thief, or a false witness, nor even willing to 
he such? But he who is an adulterer from purpose and con- 
firmation, makes light of every thing relating to religion, and 
consequently pays no regard to murders, thefts, and false wit- 
ness, not abstaining from them on account of their being sins, 
but for fear of the law or loss of character. The case is similar, 
if a person from set purpose or confirmation offends against 
any other commandment of the decalogue; he then also offends 
against the rest, because he does not account any thing a sin. 
Just so it is, also, with those who are in good from the Lord. 
Such persons, if from their will and understanding, or from 
set purpose and confirmation, they abstain from one evil be- 
cause it is a sin, abstain from all, and still more if they abstain 
from several ; for whenever a person abstains, from purpose and 
confirmation, from any evil, because it is a sin, he is kept by 
the Lord in the purpose of abstaining from the rest ; where- 
fore if, through ignorance, or any predominant concupiscence 
of the body, he commits an evil, it nevertheless is not im- 
puted to him, inasmuch as he did not purpose it to himself, 
neither does he afterwards confirm it in himself. A man 
comes into this kind of purpose, if he examines himself once 
or twice a year, and repents of the evil he discovers in him- 
self: it is otherwise with him who never examines himself. 
It is permitted to confirm what has been advanced by the fol- 
lowing experience : I have met with several in the spiritual 
w>r'.d, who had lived like other people in the natural world, 
with respect to ornaments of dress, delicacies of food, making 
inte.estof money by trade and merchandise, frequenting play- 
houses, indulging in jocose conversation on love-affairs, with 
other things of a similar nature ; and yet the angels charged 
such things as evils of sin in some, and not as evils in others, 
declaring the latter innocent, and the former guilty : on being 
asked the reason of such distinction, when both had indulged 
in like practices, they replied, that they consider all according 
to their purpose, intention, and end, and distinguish them 



DOCTRINE OF THE NEW CHURCH. 



73 



accordingly ; and therefore that they excuse and condemn 
those Whom the end excuses or condemns, inasmuch as good 
is the end that influences all who are in heaven, and evil is 
the end that influences all who are in hell. From what has 
been said it now plainly appears, to whom sin is imputed, and 
to whom it is not imputed. 



114. To the above shall be added the two following 
Memorable Relations, taken from the Apoealypse Revealed. 
First. I was once seized suddenly with a disease that seem- 
ed to threaten my life ; my whole head was oppressed with 
pain ; a pestilential smoke was let in from the great city called 
Sodom and Egypt, Apoc. xi. 8; half dead with severe anguish, 
I expected every moment to be my last : thus I lay in bed for 
the space of three days and a half : my spirit was reduced to 
this state, and in consequence thereof my body. Then I 
heard about me the voices of persons saying, " Lo! he lies 
dead in the street of our city, who preached repentance for 
the remission of sins, and preached Christ alone [who is] a 
man ;" and they asked several of the clergy, whether he was 
worthy of burial, as it is said concerning the two witnesses 
slain in that city, chap. xi. 8, 9, 10 ; and they answered, " No, 
let him lie to be made a spectacle of and they passed to and 
fro, and mocked. All this befell me of a truth, whilst I was 
writing the explication of the eleventh chapter of the Apoc- 
alypse. Then were heard shocking speeches from them, such 
as the following : "How can repentance be performed without 
faith ? And how can Christ, a man, be adored as God ? Whilst 
we are saved freely without any merit of our own, what need 
IS there of any thing but only the faith, that God the Father 
sent the Son to take away the curse of the law, to impute His 
merit to us, and so to justify us in His sight, and absolve us 
from our sins, and then to give the Holy Spirit to operate all 
good in us? Arc not these doctrines agreeable to Scripture, 
and to reason also?" The crowd who stood by received these 
speeches with great applause. I heard all this without any 
power to reply, being almost dead : but after three days and 
a half my spirit recovered, and I went forth from the street 
into the city, (being in the spirit,) and again said, "Repent, 
and believe on Christ, and your sins shall bo remitted, and ye 
shall be saved, but otherwise ye shall perish : did not the Lord 
Himself preach repentance for the remission of sins, and 
tint men should believe on Him ? Did Ho not enjoin His 
7 



74 



A BRIEF EXPOSITION OF THE 



disciples to preach the same ? Is not a full and fatal security 
of life the sure consequence of your faith?" But they replied, 
" What idle talk ! Has not the Son made satisfaction? And 
does not the Father impute it to us, and justify us who have 
believed in it ? Thus we are led by the spirit of grace, and 
how then can sin have place in us, and what power has death 
to hurt us? Dost thou comprehend this gospel, thou preacher 
of sin and repentance?" At that instant a voice was heard 
from heaven, saying, "What is the faith of an impenitent 
man, but a dead faith? The end is come, the end is come, 
upon you that are secure, unblamable in your own eyes, 
justified in your own faith, yet devils;" — and suddenly a deep 
gulf was opened in the midst of the city, which spread itself 
far and wide, and the houses fell one upon another, and were 
swallowed up ; and presently water began to bubble up from 
the large whirlpool, and overflowed the waste. 

When they were thus overwhelmed, and to appearance 
drowned, I was desirous to know their condition in the deep: 
and a voice from heaven said to me, " Thou shalt see and 
hear :" and immediately the waters wherein they seemed to be 
drowned disappeared, (for waters in the spiritual world are cor- 
respondences, and consequently appear to surround those who 
are under the influence of falses;) and then they appeared to 
me in a sandy bottom, where were large heaps of stones, 
among which they ran, and lamented that they were cast out 
of their great city : and they lifted up their voices and cried, 
"Why has all this befallen us? Are we not, through our 
faith, clean, pure, just, and holy?" Others exclaimed, "Are 
we not, through our faith, cleansed, purified, justified, and 
sanctified V And others cried, " Are we not, through our 
faith, rendered worthy to be reputed and esteemed clean, pure, 
just, and holy, before God the Father, and before the whole 
Trinity, and to be pronounced such before the angels? Are 
not we reconciled, atoned, expiated, and thereby absolved, 
washed, and cleansed from sins ? And is not the curse of the 
law taken away by Christ? Why then are we cast down 
hither like condemned criminals? We have been told by a 
bold preacher of sin in our great city, Believe on Ckri<t, and 
do the work of repentance : have we not believed on Christ, 
whilst we believed on His merit ? And have we not done the 
work of repentance, whilst we confessed ourselves sinners '. 
Why then has all this befallen us ?" But immediately a 
voice from one side said to them, "Do ye know any one sin 
that ye are guilty of ? Have ye ever examined yourselves? 



DOCTRINE OF THE NEW CHURCH. 



7-3 



Have ye in consequence thereof shunned any evil as sin 
against God? And whosoever does not shun sin, remains in 
it. Is not sin the devil ? Wherefore ye are they, of whom 
the Lord saith, ' Thai shall yc begin to say, We have eaten and 
drunk in Thy presence, and Thou hast taught in our streets; 
but He shall answer, I say unto you, I know you not, ichrnce yc 
are; depart from Me, all yc workers of iniquity,' Luke xiii. 
26, 27 ; Matt. vii. 22, 23. Depart therefore every one to his 
place; ye see the openings into those caverns; enter therein, 
and work shall be given each of you to do, and afterwards 
food in proportion to your work ; but if ye refuse at present 
to enter, ye will presently be compelled by the calls of hunger." 

Afterwards there came a voice from heaven to some on 
earth there,* who were without that great city, and who are 
also described in the Apocalypse, chap. xi. 13, crying aloud, 
" Take heed to yourselves, take heed how ye associate your- 
selves with such persons; cannot ye understand, that evils, 
which are called sins and iniquities, render man unclean and 
impure ? How can man be cleansed and purified from them, 
but by actual repentance, and faith in the Lord God the Sa- 
viour ? Actual repentance consists in a man's examining 
himself, in knowing and acknowledging his sins, in making 
himself guilty, in confessing them before the Lord, in implor- 
ing help and power to resist them, and thus in desisting from 
them, and leading a new life, and doing all these things as of 
himself : practise this once or twice in a year, when ye ap- 
proach the holy communion; and afterwards when the sins, 
whereof ye made yourselves guilty, recur, then say to your- 
selves, We will not consent to them because they are sins 
against God : this is actual repentance. Who cannot see, 
that where a man does not examine himself and see his sins, he 
remains in them? For all evil is pleasant to a man from his 
birth ; it is pleasant to take revenge, to commit whoredom, to 
defraud, to blaspheme : does not the pleasure you find in them 
prevent their being seen ? And, if you are told that they are 
sins, do you not, on account of that pleasure, excuse them ? 
Nay, do you not, by false reasonings, confirm them, and per- 
suade yourselves that they are not sins ? And so you continue in 
them, and practise them afterwards more than before; even 
till you do not know what sin is, or whether there be any such 



* By earth here is lo be understood the carlh in the spiritual worlil, -which is 
of a spiritual origin, ihe existence w hereof, together with its correspondence with 
the earth in the natural world, is constantly declared by our author in all his 
spiritual experience. 



A BRIEF EXPOSITION OF THE 



thing as sin or not. But the case is otherwise with every one 
who performs actual repentance ; he calls his evils, which he 
has thus learnt to know and acknowledge, sins, and therefore 
begins to shun and detest them, and to feel their delights as 
undelightful ; and in proportion as this is the case, he sees and 
loves what is good, and at length tastes the delights of goodness, 
which are the delights of heaven : in a word, so far as any one 
renounces the devil, so far he is adopted by the Lord, and by 
Him is taught, guided, withheld from evils, and preserved in 
what is good : this is the way, and there is no other, which leads 
from hell to heaven." It is something extraordinary, that there 
is in the Reformed a certain deep-rooted opposition and aversion 
to actual repentance, which is so violent, that they cannot force 
themselves to self-examination, and to see their sins, and to con- 
fess them before God ; they are seized as it were with horror at 
the very intention of such a thing : I have inquired of many in 
the spiritual world concerning this circumstance, who have 
all told me, that it is above their power ; and when they have 
been informed that the Roman Catholics practise such duties, 
namely, that they examine themselves, and confess their sins 
openly before a monk, they have been greatly astonished, and 
likewise wondered that the Reformed cannot do the same in 
private before God, although it is alike enjoined them previous 
to their approaching the holy supper : some have examined 
into the cause of this, and found, that the doctrine of faith 
alone is what occasions such an impenitent state, and such a 
heart; and then it was given them to see, that such of the 
Romish Church as approach and adore Christ, and do not 
adore, but only honour, the leaders and heads of their church, 
are saved. 

After the above admonition, was heard as it were a noise 
of thunder, and a voice speaking from heaven, saying, "We 
are amazed : say unto the body of the Reformed, Believe on 
Christ, and do the work of repentance, and ye shall be saved." 
And I spake these words to them ; and added further, " Is not 
baptism a sacrament of repentance, and thereby an introduc- 
tion into the church 1 What else do the sponsors promise lor 
the person to be baptized, but that he will renounce the devil 
and his works ? Is not the sacred supper a sacrament of re- 
pentance, and thereby an introduction into heaven ? Is it not 
declared to the communicants, that they must do the work of 
repentance before they approach 1 Is not the Decalogue the 
doctrine of the whole Christian Church, which inculcates re* 
pentancc ? Is it not there said, in the six commandments of the 



DOCTRINE OF Tlir. NEW CHURCH. 



77 



second tabic, Thou shalt not do this and that evil, and not said, 
Thou shalt do this and that good? Hence ye may understand, 
that in proportion as any one shuns evil, in the same pro- 
portion he loves good, and that before this he docs not know 
either what good is, or what evil is." 

115. The Second Memorable lirlntlon is as follows. An 
angel once said to me, " If thou desirest to see clearly the 
nature of faith and charity, and thereby what faith is when 
separate from charity, and what it is when conjoined with 
charity, I will give thee ocular demonstration of it." I re- 
plied, " Show it me :" and he said, " Instead of faith and char- 
ity, substitute light and heat, and thou wilt see clearly what 
I mean ; for faith in its essence is the truth of wisdom, and 
charity in its essence is the affection of love, and the truth 
of wisdom in heaven is light, and the affection of love in 
heaven is heat : the light and heat which the angels feel and 
enjoy, are nothing else : hence thou mayest see clearly what 
faith is when separate from charity, and what it is when con- 
joined with charity. Faith separate from charity is like the 
liirht in winter, and faith conjoined with charity is like the 
light in spring ; the light of winter, which is light separate 
from heat, and, in consequence thereof, conjoined with cold 
strips the trees of all their leaves, kills every green herb, makes 
the ground hard, and freezes the water; but the light in 
spring, which is light conjoined with heat, causes the trees to 
vegetate, first into leaves, then into blossoms, and lastly into 
fruits: it opens and softens the ground, whereby it yields 
grass, herbs, flowers, and fruits ; and it also dissolves the ice, 
so that the waters flow from their fountains. Exactly similar 
is the case with faith and charity; faith separate from charity 
deadens all things, and faith conjoined with charity enlivens 
all things. The nature of such deadening and enlivening 
may be seen visibly in our spiritual world, because here faith 
is light, and charity heat; for where faith is conjoined with 
charity, there are paradisiacal gardens, flowery walks, and 
verdant groves, gay and delightful in proportion to such con- 
junction ; but where faith is separate from charity, there does 
not grow so much as a blade of grass, nor any green thing, 
except it be on thorns and briers." There were standing at 
a little distance from us some of the clergy, whom the angel 
called justifiers and sanctifiers of men by faith alone, and also 
arcanists, that is, dealers in mysteries : we related to them the 
same things concerning charity and faith, and likewise gave 
them ocular demonstration of the truth of our assertions; but 
1* 



78 



A BRIEF EXPOSITION OF THE 



when we asked them whether they believed it to be so, they 
turned their backs upon us, and said, " We do not hear you ;" 
whereupon we raised our voices, and cried, " Hear us now 
then ;" but immediately they stopped their ears with both 
hands, and exclaimed, " We will not to hear." 



CONCLUSION. 



From Jeremiah, chap. vii. 2, 3, 4, 9, 10, 11. 

Stand in the gate of the house of Jehovah, and proclaim 
there this word: Thus saith Jehovah of hosts, the God of Israel: 
Amend your ways, and your works ; trust ye not in lying words, 
saying, The temple of Jehovcdi, the temple of Jehovah, the temple 
of Jehovah is here (that is, the church) : will ye steal, murder, 
commit adultery, and sivcar falsely, and after that come and 
stand before Me in this house, whereon My name is called, and 
say, We arc delivered, whilst ye do all these abominations ? L 
not this house become a den of robbers ? Even I, behold, J have 
seen, saith Jehovah. 



DOCTRINE OF THE NEW CHURCH. 



79 



APPENDIX. 



116. The Faith of the New Heaven and New Church, 
tn its universal form, is this: — That the Lord from eternity, 
who is Jehovah, came into the world, that He might sub- 
due the hells, and glorify His Humanity ; that without this 
coming no mortal could have been saved ; and that all will 
be saved who believe in Him. 

It is called faith in its universal form, because this is the 
universal of faith, and the universal of faith is what must 
enter into all and every particular part thereof. It is a 
universal of faith, that God is one m essence and person, 
in whom is a trinity, and that the Lord God the Saviour 
Jesus Christ is He. It is a universal of faith, that no 
mortal could have been saved, unless the Lord had come 
into the world. It is a universal of faith, that He came 
into the world to remove hell from man, which He effect- 
ed by combats against it, and victories over it ; whereby 
He subdued it, and reduced it to order, and under obedi- 
ence to Himself. It is a universal of faith, that He came 
into the world to glorify the Humanity which He assumed 
in the world, that is, to unite it with the Divinity of which 
it was begotten ; thus having subdued hell, He keeps it 
eternally in order and under obedience to Himself. Inas- 
much as both these works [the subjugation of hell, and the 
glorification of His Humanity] could only be effected by 
means of temptations admitted into His Humanity, even to 
the last, which was the passion of the cross ; therefore He 
endured that also. These are the universals of faith con- 
cerning the Lord. 

The universal of Christian faidi on man's part is, that 
he should believe on die Lord, for by believing on Him 
he has conjunction with Him, and by conjunction salvation. 
To believe on Him, is to have confidence that He will 
save ; and because none can have such confidence but he 
who leads a good life, dierefore this also is meant by be- 
lieving on Him. 

117. The Faith of the New Heaven and New Church, 



80 



A BKIEF EXPOSITION OF THE 



in its particular form, is this : — That Jehovah God is es- 
sential love and essential wisdom, or that He is essential 
good and essential truth ; and that as to His divine truth, 
which is the Word, and which was God with God, He 
came down and assumed Humanity, for the purpose of 
restoring to order all things which were in heaven, and 
which were in hell, and which were in the church ; inas- 
much as at that time tlie power of the devil, that is, of hell, 
prevailed over the power of heaven, and on earth the power 
of evil prevailed over the power of good ; in consequence 
whereof, a total destruction and damnation were at hand, 
and threatened every creature : this impending destruc- 
tion and damnation Jehovah God removed by His Hu- 
manity, which was divine truth, and thus He redeemed 
both angels and men ; and afterwards He united in His 
Humanity divine truth with divine good, and thus return- 
ed into His Divinity, in which He was from eternity, to- 
gether with His glorified Humanity. This is signified by 
these words in John: " The Word was with God, and 
God ivas the Word; and the Word became flesh," chap, 
i. 1, 14; and in another place, " / went forth from the 
Father, and am come into the world; again I leave the 
world, and go to the Father," chap. xvi. 28. Hence it ap- 
pears, that unless the Lord had come into the world, no one 
could have been saved. The case is similar at this day ; 
wherefore, unless the Lord come again into the world in 
Divine Truth, which is the Word, no person can be saved. 

The particulars of faith on the part of man are these : 
— I. That God is one, in whom is a divine trinity, and that 
the Lord God the Saviour Jesus Christ is that God. II. 
That a saving faith is to believe on Him. III. That evils 
ought to be shunned, because they are of the devil and 
from the devil. IV. That good actions ought to be done, 
because they are of God and from God. V. And that 
they should be done by man as of himself, nevertheless 
under this belief, that they are from the Lord operating in 
him and by him. The two first particulars have relation 
to faith ; the two next to charity ; and the last respects 
the conjunction of charity and faith, and thereby of the 
Lord and man. — Refer also to what has been said above, 
n. 44, on this subject. 



DOCTRINE OF THE NEW CHURCH. 



81 



The Three following Memorable Relations are taken 
from the Apocalypse Revealed. 

118. First Memorable Relation. While I was writing the 
explication of the 20th chapter of the Apocalypse, and medi- 
tating about the dragon, the beast, and the false prophet, a 
certain angelic spirit appeared before me, and asked what 
was the subject of my meditation. I answered, "Concerning 
the false prophet." Then he said, "I will lead thee to the 
place of the abode of those who are signified by the false 
prophet, and who are the same that are understood, in the 
13th chapter of the Apocalypse, by the beast rising from the 
earth, which had two horns like a lamb, and spake like a 
dragon." I followed him, and, lo ! I saw a great multitude of 
people, and in the midst of them several persons of note and 
distinction in the church, who had taught, that man is saved 
only by faith in the merits of Christ, and that works are good 
and profitable, but not in regard to salvation, but that never- 
theless they are to be recommended as agreeable to the Word, 
and as a means of keeping the laity, particularly the simple 
amongst them, in stricter obedience to the civil magistrate, 
and instigating them to the exercise of moral charity, as if 
from interior obligations arising from religion. Then one of 
them, observing me, said, "Do you wish to see our place of 
warship, wherein is an image representative of our faith?" 
On which he conducted me to a building which was very 
magnificent, and, lo ! in the midst of it there was an image of 
a woman, clothed in a scarlet vest, and holding in her right 
hand a piece of gold coin, and in her left a chain of pearls : 
but both the image and the place of worship were the effect 
of phantasy ; for thereby infernal spirits have the power to 
represent very magnificent objects, by closing the interiors of 
the mind, and opening only its exteriors. When I perceived, 
however, that all this was a mere trick and delusion, I prayed 
to the Lord, and suddenly the interiors of my mind were 
opened, and then I beheld, instead of the magnificent dome, 
a poor house, full of clefts and chinks from top to bottom, 
without any order or regularity about it ; and I saw within 
the house, instead of the woman, a pendent image, with a 
head like a dragon, a body like a leopard, feet like a bear, 
and a mouth like a lion, in every respect as the beast rising 
out of the sea is described, Apoc. xiii. '2 : moreover, instead 
of firm ground, there was nothing but a bog containing a 



S3 



A BRIEF EXPOSITION OF THE 



multitude of frogs ; and I was informed, that beneath the bog 
was a large hewn stone, under which the Word lay entirely 
concealed. On seeing these things, I said to the conjurer^ 
"Is this your place of worship?" And he replied, "It is; v 
but suddenly, at that very instant, his interior sight was open- 
ed, whereby he saw the same appearances that I did ; where- 
upon he cried out with a loud voice, " What and whence in 
all this?" And I said, "This is in consequence of light from 
heaven, which discovers the quality of every form, and thus 
has discovered the quality of your faith separate from the 
spiritual principle of charity." Then immediately an east- 
wind blew, and carried away the place of worship, together 
with the image, and likewise dried up the bog, and thereby 
exposed the stone, under which lay the Word. After this a 
vernal warmth breathed from heaven, and, lo! then in the 
same place there appeared a tabernacle, as to its outward form 
plain and simple ; and the angels who were with me said, 
"Behold the tabernacle of Abraham, such as it was when the 
three angels came to him, and announced the future birth of 
Isaac . it appears indeed plain and simple to the eye, but 
nevertheless, in proportion to the influx of light from heaven, 
it becomes more and more magnificent." They were then 
permitted to open the heaven, which is the abode of thft 
spiritual angels, who excel in wisdom; whereupon, by virtue 
of the influx of light from thence, the tabernacle appeared as 
a temple, resembling that at Jerusalem; and on looking into 
it, I saw the stone in the floor, under which the Word was 
deposited, beset with precious stones, from which there issued 
forth bright rays, as of lightning, that shone upon the walls, 
and caused beautiful variegations of colours on certain cheru 
bic forms that were sculptured thereon. As I was wondering 
at these prodigies, the angels said, " Thou shalt yet see some- 
thing more surprising." Then they were permitted to open 
the third heaven, which is the abode of the celestial angels, 
who excel in love ; and suddenly, by virtue of the influx of 
light from thence, the whole temple disappeared, and instead 
thereof was seen the Lord alone, standing on the stone below, 
which was the Word, in the same form and figure that 
He appeared in before John, Apoc. chap. i. But whereas a 
divine sanctity instantly filled the interiors of the angels' 
minds, whereby they felt a strong propensity to fall prostrate 
on their faces, suddenly the passage of light from the third 
heaven was closed by the Lord, and that from the second 
heaven opened again, in consequence whereof the former ap- 



DOCTRINE OF THE NEW CHURCH. 



S3 



pearance of the temple returned, and also of the tabernacle, 
but this was in the temple. Hereby was illustrated the mean- 
ing of these words in the Apocalypse, chap. xxi. "Behold, 
the tabernacle, of God is with men, and He will dwell with 
them," verse 3; and also of these : " I saw no temple, in the 
JYew Jerusalem, for the. Lord God Omnipotent and the Lamb 
are the temple of it," verse 22. 

119. The Second Memorable Relation from the Apocalypse 
Revealed. Awaking on a time out of sleep, I fell into a pro- 
found meditation about God; and when I looked upwards, 
I saw in the heaven above me a most clear shining light in 
an oval form ; and as I fixed my eyes attentively upon the 
light, it moved gradually from the centre towards the circum- 
ference; and lo! then heaven was opened unto me, and I be- 
held magnificent scenes, and saw angels standing in the form 
of a circle, on the southern side of the opening, in conversa- 
tion with each other ; and because I earnestly desired to know 
what they were conversing about, it was permitted me first to 
near the sound of their voices, which was full of celestial love, 
and afterwards to distinguish their speech, which was full of 
wisdom flowing from that love. They conversed together 
concerning the One God, of conjunction with Him, and salva- 
tion thereby. The matter of their discourse was for the most 
part ineffable, there being no words in any natural language 
adapted to convey its meaning ; but as I had oftentimes been 
in consort with angels in their heaven, and, being at such 
times in a similar state with them, was also in the use and 
understanding of their language, therefore I was now able to 
comprehend what they said, and to collect some particulars 
from their conversation, which may be intelligibly expressed 
in the words of natural language. They said that the Divine 
Esse is One, the Same, the Real, (Ipsttm,) and Indivisible : that 
so also is the Divine Essence, inasmuch as the Divine Esse is 
the Divine Essence; and that so, likewise, is God, for the 
Divine Essence, which is also the Divine Esse, is God. This 
they illustrated by spiritual ideas, saying, that the Divine Esse 
cannot possibly belong to several, so as to be a Divine Esse 
in each of them, and yet remain One, the Same, the Real, 
and Indivisible ; for on such a supposition, each would think 
from his own esse of and by himself ; or should the thoughts 
of each be influenced at the same time from and by the rest, 
to agreement and unanimity, they would then be several 
unanimous Gods, and not one God ; for unanimity, being the 
consent of several, and at the same time of each from and by 



84 



A BRIEF EXPOSITION OF THE 



himself, does not comport with the unity of God, hut implies 
plurality; they did not say, of Gods, because they could not, 
inasmuch as the light of heaven, which gave birth to their 
thought, and which conveyed their words, was in opposition 
to that expression. They added further, that when they meant 
to pronounce the word Gods, and each as a distinct person by 
Himself, the power of pronunciation was diverted immediately 
to utter one God, yea, the only God. Again, they proved 
that the Divine Esse is the Divine Esse in itself, not from it- 
self, because to be from itself supposes an Esse in itself from 
another; thus it supposes a God from a God, which is not 
possible: what is from God is not called God, but is called 
divine ; for what is God from God ; consequently what is 
God from God born from eternity ; and what is God from God 
proceeding through a God born from eternity ; but obscure 
words, that have no light in them from heaven ? They said 
further, that the Divine Esse, which in itself is God, is the 
Same : not simply the Same, but infinitely the Same, that 
is, the Same from eternity to eternity; it is the Same in every 
place, and the Same with every one, and in every one ; but that 
all variableness and changeableness is in the recipient, 
occasioned by the peculiar state and circumstances thereof. 
That the Divine Esse, which is God in himself, is the Real* 
they thus explained : God is the Real, because He is love it- 
self, and wisdom itself, or, what is the same, because He is good 
itself, and truth itself, and of consequence life itself; which, 
unless they were real in God, could have no existence in heav- 
en or in the world, inasmuch as there would be nothing in 
them that had relation to what is real; for all quality has its 
quality from this condition of its existence, that there be a 
something real, from whence it is derived, and to which it 
has relation as the cause of its peculiar quality : thiS Reality, 
which is the Divine Esse, is not in place, but with those 
and in those who are in place, according to its reception ; 
inasmuch as neither place, nor progression from one place 
to another, is predicable of love and wisdom, or of good- 
ness and truth, or of life derived thence, which are Reality in 
God, nay, Real God [or God Himself] ; but sucli things exist 
in God without place, and this is the foundation of the divine 

* The lerm Ipsum, here and elsewhere in this Memorable Relation translated. 



below, when "used aiijecti vcU in connection with the terms lo\e J»j>d wisdom, 
good and truth ; but as we cannot, consistently with the idiom of the English Ian- 
gunge, use the term Itself or Hie Itself, absolutely, the wold litai is subsUtuted, 
as coming nearest to it in signification. 




DOCTRINE OF THE NEW CHURCH. 



8.3 



omnipresence ; wherefore the Lord says, " That He is in the 
midst of them, and that He is in them, and they in Him." But 
since He cannot be received by any creature such as He is in 
Himself, He appears such as He is in Himself as a sun above 
the angelic heavens, that which proceeds thence as light 
being Himself as to wisdom, and that which proceeds thence 
as heat being Himself as to love : yet He Himself is not that 
sun, but divine love and divine wisdom in their proximate 
emanation from Him, and round about Him, appear as a sun 
before the angels : Himself in the sun is a Man, owe Lord 
Jesus Christ, both with respect to the All-begetting Divinity 
(l)irinum a Quo), and with respect to the Divine Human ; 
inasmuch as the Real Esse, which is love itself, and wisdom 
itself, was His soul from the Father, and thus divine life, 
which is life in itself; the case is otherwise with man, for in 
him the soul is not life, but a recipient of life : this the Lord 
also teaches when He says, " / am the Way, the Truth, and 
the Life;" and in another place, " As the Father hath life in 
Hi hi si (t, so hath Hi given to the Son to have life in Himself," 
John v. ■2C> : life in Himself is God. They further added, that 
whosoever is under the influence of any spiritual light, may 
see plainly from what has been said, that the Divine Esse, 
which is also the Divine Essence, being One, the Same, the 
Real, and of consequence Indivisible, cannot possibly exist in 
more than one ; and that if it should be supposed to exist in 
more, manifest contradictions would follow upon such a sup- 
position. 

As I listened to this discourse, the angels perceived in my 
thought the common ideas respecting God entertained in the 
Christian church, of a trinity of persons in unity, and their 
unity in trinity ; as also of the birth of the Son of God from 
eternity ; whereupon they said to me, " What notions are 
these which thou entertainest ? Are they not the offspring of 
natural light, wherewith our spiritual light hath no agree- 
ment ? Unless, therefore, thou removest these ideas from thy 
mind, we must shut heaven against thee and begone." But 
I replied, " Enter, I beseech you, more deeply into my 
thought, and possibly you will find it in agreement with your 
own." And they did so, and perceived, that by three per- 
sons I understood three proceeding divine attributes, which 
are creation, redemption, and regeneration, and that those 
attributes belong to one God ; and that by the birth of the 
Son of God from eternity, I understood His birth foreseen 
from eternity, and provided in time. I then acquainted them, 



80 



A BRIEF EXPOSITION OF THE 



that I had received this my natural idea of a trinity and unity 
of persons, and of the birth of the Son of God from eternity, 
from the doctrine of faitli in the church, that has its name 
from Athanasius ; and that that doctrine is right, if only in- 
stead of a trinity of persons is substituted therein a trinity of 
person, which solely exists in the Lord Jesus Christ; and if, 
instead of the birth of the Son of God from eternity, is under- 
stood His birth foreseen from eternity, and provided in time, 
because as to the Humanity which He assumed, He is ex- 
pressly called the Son of God. Then the angels said, 
Well, well ; and they desired me to declare upon their testi- 
mony, that whosoever does not approach the real God of 
heaven and earth, cannot have entrance into heaven, inas- 
much as heaven is heaven from that God only ; and that that 
God is Jesus Christ, who is Jehovah Lord, from eternity 
Creator, in time Redeemer, and to eternity Regenerator ; of 
consequence, who is at once Father, Son, and Holy Ghost; 
and that this is the gospel, which is to be preached. After 
this, the heavenly light, which I had before seen over the 
aperture, returned, and by degrees descended thence, and 
filled the interiors of my mind, and illuminated my ideas con- 
cerning the unity and trinity of God ; and then I perceived, 
that the ideas which I had originally entertained about them, 
and which were merely natural, were separated, as chaff is 
separated from the wheat by winnowing, and that they were 
carried away, as by a wind, to the northern part of heaven, 
and there disappeared. 

120. The Third Memorable. Relation, from the Apocalypse 
Revealed. Inasmuch as the Lord has favoured me with a 
sight of the wonderful things that are in the heavens, and 
under the heavens, it is therefore my duty, in the discharge 
of my commission, to relate what I have seen. There was 
shown me a magnificent palace, with a temple in its inmost 
part, and in the midst of the temple was a table of gold, on 
which lay the Word, and two angels stood beside it. Ahout 
the table were three rows of seals; the seats of the first row 
were covered with silk damask of a purple colour; the seats 
of the second row with silk damask of a blue colour ; and the 
seats of the third row with white cloth. Below the roof, high 
above the table, there was seen a spreading curtain, which 
shone with precious stones, from whose lustre there issued 
forth a bright appearance as of a rainbow, when the firma- 
ment is clear and serene after a shower. Then suddenly 
there appeared a number of clergy sitting on the scats, all 



DOCTRINE OF THE NEW CHURCH. 



87 



clothed in the garments of their sacerdotal office. On one 
side was a wardrobe, where stood an angel who had the care 
of it, and within lay splendid vestments in beautiful order. It 
was a Council convened by the Lord ; and I heard a voice 
from heaven saying, Deliberate; but they said, on what? It 
was said, Concerning the Lord the Saviour, and concerning 
the Holy Spirit. But when they began to think on these 
subjects, they were without illustration ; wherefore they made 
supplication, and immediately light issued down out of heaven, 
which first illuminated the hinder part of their heads, and 
afterwards their temples, and last of all their faces ; and then 
they began their deliberation, and, as they were commanded, 
First., concerning the Lord the Saviour. The first proposition 
and matter of inquiry was, who assumed the Humanity in the 
Virgin Mary ? And the angel standing at the table, on which 
the Word lay, read before them these words in Luke : " The 
angel said unto Mary, Behold, thou shall conceive in thy ivomb, 
and bring forth a Son, and shalt rail His name Jesus ; He 
shall be great, and shall be called the Son of the Highest. 
And Mary said to the angel, How shall this be, seeing I know 
not a man ? And the angel answering said, the Holy Spirit 
shall come ripon thee, and the power o f the Highest shall over- 
shadow thee, wherefore also that Holy Thing which shall be bom 
of thee shall be called the Son of God," chap. i. 31, 32, 34, 35. 
Then he also read from the 20th to the 25th verse of the first 
chapter of Matthew, and when he came to the 25th verse, he 
uttered it witli a loud voice. Besides these passages he read 
many more out of the Evangelists, as Matt. iii. 17, chap, 
xvii. 5. John xx. 31 ; and several other places, where the 
Lord as to His Humanity is called the Son of God, and where 
He, from His Humanity, calls Jehovah Bis Father; and also 
out of the Prophets, where it is foretold that Jehovah Himself 
should come into the world ; particularly these two passages 
in Isaiah : " It shall be said in that day, lo ! this is our God, 
whom wi have <r petted to deliver us; this is Jehovah, whom 
we have expected; ht us exult and be glad in His salvation," 
chap. xxv. {) : " The voire of him that crieth in the desert, 
prepare ye the way of Jehovah, medec straight in the wilderness 
a highway for our God : for the glory of Jehovah shall be re- 
vealed; and all flesh shall see it together ; behold, the Lord 
Jehovah cometh in strength; He shall f ed His fock like a 
shepherd," chap. xl. 3,5, 10, 11. And the angel said, inas- 
much as Jehovah Himself came into the world, and assumed 
the Humanity, whereby He has redeemed and saved men, 



83 



A BRIEF EXPOSITION OF THE 



therefore He is called by the prophets the Saviour and the 
Redeemer; and then lie read before them the following pas- 
sages : " Surely God is in Thee, and there is no God beside ; 
verily Thou art a God that hidest Thyself, O God of Israel 
the Saviour," Isaiah xlv. 14, 15 : "Am not I Jehovah ? and 
there is no God else beside Me; a just God, and there is no 
Saviour beside Me," chap. xlv. 21 : " lam Jehovah, and beside 
Me there is no Saviour," chap, xliii. 11- "I am Jehovah 
thy God, and thou s/tedt acknowledge no God beside Me, and 
there is no Saviour beside Me," Hosea xiii. 4 : " That all 
flesh may know, that I Jehovah am thy Saviour and thy Re- 
deemer," Isaiah xlix. 20. chap. lx. 16 : " As for our Re- 
deemer, Jehovah of Hosts is His name," chap, xlvii. 4. 
" Their Redeemer, the strong Jehovah of Ilosts is His name," 
Jeremiah 1. 34: "Jehovah is my Roek and my Redeemer" 
Psalm xix. 14: "Thus saith Jehovah thy Redeemer, the 
Holy One of Israel, I Jehovah am thy God," Isaiah xlviii. 
17. chap, xliii. 14, chap. xlix. 7, chap. liv. 8 : " Thou 
Jehovah etrt our Father ; our Redeemer from the age is Thy 
name," chap, lxiii. 10 : " Thus saith Jehovah thy Redeemer, 
I am Jehovah that maketh edl things, and (done by Myself" 
Isaiah xliv. 24 : " Thus saith Jehovah the King of Israel, 
and His Redeemer Jehovah of Ilosts, I am the First and the 
Last, and beside Me there is no God," chap. xliv. (i : Jehovah 
of Hosts is His name, and thy Redeemer the Holy One of 
Israel, the God of the whole earth shall He be called," chap, 
liv. 5: "Behold, the days shall come, when I will reuse unto 
David a righteous branch, who shall reign a King, and this 
is His name, Jehovah our Righteousness," Jerem. xxiii. 5, 
6: chap, xxxiii. 15, 10: "In that day Jehovah shall be 
King over all the earth ; in that day there shedl be one Je- 
hovah, and His name one," Zech. xiv. 9. From all these 
passages collected, they that sat on the seats were unanimously 
confirmed in this opinion, viz. that Jehovah Himself assumed 
the Humanity, for the purpose of redeeming and saving man- 
kind. But instantly a voice was heard from some Roman 
Catholics, who had hid themselves behind the altar, saying, 
How can Jehovah the Father become a man ? Is He not the 
Creator of the universe? And one of those who sat on the 
second row of seats turned himself towards the voice, and 
said, Who was it then ? And he who had been concealed behind 
the altar, standing then near the altar, replied, The Son from 
eternity : but answer was returned, Is not the Son from eternity, 
according to your own confession, also the Creator of the 



DOCTRINE OF THE NEW CHURCH. 89 

universe? And what is a Son, or a God, born from eternity? 
And how is it possible for the Divine Essence, which is one 
and indivisible, to be separated, so that one part can descend, 
without the whole ? The. second matter of inquiry concerning 
the Lord was, whether or no, according to this reasoning, 
the Father and He are one, as the soul and the body are one ? 
And they said, that this must follow of consequence, inas- 
much as the soul is from the Father. Then one of those, 
who sat on the third row of seats, read out of the Confession 
of Faith, called the Athanasian Creed, the following passage: 
"Although our Lord Jesus Christ, the Son of God, is God 
and Man, yet He is not two, bid one Chris ; yea, lie is in 
every respect one, bring one person r for as the soul and body 
make one man, so God and man are one Christ." lie added, 
that this faith is received throughout the whole Christian 
world, even by the Roman Catholics. Then they said, what 
need have we of further proof? God the Father and lie are 
one, as the soul and body arc one ; and since this is the case, 
we perceive that the Humanity of the Lord is Divine, be- 
cause it is the Humanity of Jehovah ; likewise that the Lord 
ought to be approached as to His Divine Humanity ; and that 
thus and in no other possible way can access be had to the 
Divinity which is called the Father. This conclusion of 
theirs the angel confirmed by several passages out of the 
Word ; amongst which were these : in Isaiah : " Unto us a 
Child is born, unto us a S071 is given, whose name shall be, 
Wonderful, Counsellor, God, Hero, Father of Eternity, 
Prinri of Peace,'' chap. ix. 5: again: "Abraham knowcth 
us not, and Israel doth not acknowledge us ; Thou Jehovah art 
our Father, our Redeemer, from the age is Thy name," chap, 
lxiii. 16 : and in John: "Jesus said, he that believeth on Me, 
believcth on Him that sent Mr, and he that srrth Me, seeth 
Him that sent Me," John xii. 44, 45 ; " Philip said unto 
Jesus, show us the Father; Jesus saith unto him, he that seeth 
Mr, seith the Father; how then sayest thou, show us the Fa- 
(her; beUevest thou not that I am in the Fed her, and the 
Father in Me, believe Me that 1 am in the Father, and the 
Father in Me," John xiv. 8,9: "Jesus said, I and the. 
Father arc one," chap. x. 30 : and again : " All things that 
the Father hath are Mine, and all Mine arc the Father's," 
chap. xvi. 15, chap. xvii. 10 : lastly : " Jesus said, I am 
t/ii way, the truth, and the life; no one comcth to the Father 
but by Me," chap. xvi. 6. When the angel had ended, they 
all declared with one mouth and one heart, that the Humanity 
8* 



on 



A I1RIEF EXPOSITION OF THE 



of the Lord is Divine, and that this ought to be approached in 
order to come at the Father ; inasmuch as Jehovah God, who 
is the Lord from eternity, by the Humanity sent Himself into 
the world, and made Himself visible to mankind, and thereby 
gave them access unto Him. In like manner He made Him- 
self visible to men of old time, in a human form, and so gave 
them access unto Him ; but then it was by means of an angel. 

After this they proceeded to deliberate about the Holy 
Spirit ; and previous thereto, they laid open the idea gener- 
ally received concerning God the Father, the Son, and the 
Holy Spirit, which is, that God the Father is seated on high, 
with the Son at His right hand, and that by them is sent forth 
the Holy Spirit, to enlighten and instruct mankind. But in- 
stantly a voice was heard from heaven, saying, we cannot en- 
dure an idea formed on such a conception ; who does not 
know, that Jehovah God is omnipresent ? And whosoever 
knows and acknowledges this truth, must also acknowledge, 
that it is He who enlightens and instructs ; and that there is 
not a mediating God distinct from Him ; much less is there a 
third God distinct from two others, as one person is distinct 
from another person ; wherefore let the former idea, which is 
vain and frivolous, be removed, and let this, which is just and 
right, be received, and then you will see clearly. But im- 
mediately a voice was heard again from the Iloman Catholics, 
who had concealed themselves behind the altar of the temple, 
saying, what then is the Holy Spirit, mentioned in the writings 
of the Evangelists, and Paul, by whom so many learned men 
among the clergy, and particularly of our church, profess 
themselves to be guided ? What person in Christendom at this 
day denies the Holy Spirit, and His operations ? Upon this one 
who sat on the second row of seats, turned towards the altar, 
and said, ye insist that the Holy Spirit is a distinct person of 
Himself, and a distinct God of Himself; but what is a person 
coming forth and proceeding from a person, except the opera- 
tion which comes forth and proceeds? One person cannot 
come forth and proceed from another, by another, but opera- 
tion can ; or what is a God coming forth and proceeding from 
a God, but the Divine Principle which comes forth and pro- 
ceeds ? One God cannot come forth and proceed from an- 
other, by another, but what is Divine may come forth and pro- 
ceed from one God. Is not the Divine Essence one and in- 
divisible? and inasmuch as the Divine Essence or the Divine 
Esse is God, is not God therefore one and indivisible? On 
hearing these words, they that sat on the seats unanimously 



DOCTRINE OF THE NEW CHURCH. 



91 



agreed in this conclusion, that the Holy Spirit is not a distinct 
person of Himself, consequently not a distinct God of Himself; 
but that by the Holy Spirit is meant the Divine Sanctity com- 
ing forth and proceeding from the one only omnipresent God, 
who is the Lord. To this the angels, w ho stood at the golden 
table, whereon the Word was placed, said, Well; it is not 
written in any part of the Old Testament, that the prophets 
spake the Word from the Holy Spirit, but from Jehovah the 
Lord ; and wherever the Holy Spirit is mentioned in the New 
Testament, it signifies the Divine Proceeding, which is the 
Divine Principle that enlightens, instructs, vivifies, reforms and 
regenerates. After this came on another subject of inquiry, 
respecting the Holy Spirit, viz. From whom proceeds the 
Divine Principle which is called the Holy Spirit ; whether 
from the Divine which is called the Father, or from the 
Divine Human which is called the Son ? And whilst they 
were engaged in this inquiry, there shone a light from heav- 
en, whereby they saw, that the Divine Sanctity, which is 
signified by the Holy Spirit, proceeds from the Divine in the 
Lord by His glorified Humanity, which is the Divine Hu- 
manity, comparatively as all activity proceeds from the soul by 
the body with man. This the angel who stood at the table con- 
firmed by the following passages : " He, whom the Father hath 
sent, speaketh the words of God ; He hath not given the Spirit 
by measure unto Mini ; the Father loveth the Son, and hath 
given all things into His hand," John iii. 34, 35 : " There 
shall come forth a rod out of the stem of Jesse, the Spirit of 
Jehmak shall rest upon Him, the Spirit of Wisdom and Un- 
derstanding, the Spirit of Counsel and Might," Isaiah xi. 1, 
2 : " That the Spirit of Jehovah was put upon Him, and was 
in Him," chap. xlii. 1, chap. lix. 19, 21, chap. lxi. 1. Luke 
iv. 18 : " When the Holy Spirit shall come, whom I will send 
unto you from the Father," John xv. 26 : "He shall glorify Me, 
for He shall receive of Mine, and shall show it unto you ; all 
things that the Father hath are Mine, wherefore I said, that 
He shall receive of Mine, and shall show it unto you," John 
xvi. 14, 15 : " If I go away, I will send the Comforter unto 
you," John xvi. 7 : " The Comforter is the Holy Spirit," John 

xiv. 2(5 : " The Holy Spirit was not yet, because Jesus was not 
yet glorified," John vii. 39 : but after His glorification, "Jesus 
breathed on His disciples, and said, Reci ive ye the Holy Spir- 
it," John xx. 22 : and in the Apocalypse : " Who shall not glo- 
rify Tin/ name, OLord, because Thou Alone art Holy," chap. 

xv. 4. Inasmuch as the Divine Operation of the Lord, by virtue 



A BRIEF EXPOSITION, &C. 



of His divine omnipresence, is signified by the Holy Spirit, 
therefore when the Lord spake to His disciples concerning 
the Holy Spirit, whom He would send from God the Father, 
He also said, " I will not leave you comfortless ; I go away and 
conic again unto you ; and in that day ye shall know, that I 
am in My Father, and ye in Me, and tin you," John xiv. 
IS, 20. 28 : and just before His departure out of world, He 
said, " Lo ! I am with you all the days, even to the consttm- 
mation of the age," Matt, xxviii. 20. Having read these 
words in their presence, the angels said, From these, and 
many other passages in the Word, it is evident, that the 
Divine Principle which is called the Holy Spirit, proceeds 
from the Divine in the Lord by His Divine Human. Where- 
upon they that sat on the seats all exclaimed, This is Divine 
Truth. 

Lastly, this decree was passed : That from what has been 
deliberated in this council, we clearly see, and of consequence 
acknowledge as holy truth, that in the Lord God the Saviour 
Jesus Christ there is a Divine Trinity, consisting of the All- 
begetting Divinity which is called Father, the Divine Hu- 
manity which is the Son, and the Divine Proceeding which 
is the Holy Spirit: then they lifted up their voices together, 
saying, " In Jesus Christ din Hit h all the fullness of the Di- 
vinity bodily" Col. ii. 9. Thus there is One God in the 
church. 

When these conclusions were determined in that magnifi- 
cent council, they rose up to depart ; and the angel, the 
Iceeper of the wardrobe, presented to each of them who sat 
on the seats, splendid garments, interwoven here and there 
with threads of gold, and said, Receive ye these wedding 
garments. And they were conducted in a glorious manner to 
the New Christian Heaven, w ith which the church of the 
Lord on earth, which is the New Jerusalem, will be in con- 
junction. 



ZECHARIAH, chap. xiv. ver. 7, 9, 9. 

It shall be one day which is known to Jehovah, not day nor 
night, for about evening-time it shall be light. It shall come 
to pass in that day, living waters shall go out from Jerusalem : 
and Jehovah shall be King overall the earth: in that day 
there shall be One Jehovah, and His name One. 



END 



NEW CHURCH BOOKS, 

PUBLISHED AND FOR SALE BY OTIS CLAPP. 



SWEDENBORG'S WRITINGS. 



HEAVENLY ARCANA ; or Heavenly Mysteries contained in the Sacred Scripture 
or Word of the Lord, manifested and laid open ; beginning with the Book of Genesis. 

Interspersed with Relati i of Wonderful Thincs fen in the World of Spirits and the 

Heaven of Angels : and INDEX. 13 vols. 8vo. «33.00. Without the Index, $30.00. 

THE APOCALYPSE REVEALED ; wherein are disclosed the Arcana therein 
foretold, which have hitherto remained concealed. With an INDEX. 3 vols. «2.00. 

THE APOCALYPSE EXPLAINED according to the Spiritual Sense; wherein 
are revealed (more at large and more folly illustrated than in the preceding Work) the 
Arcana which are predicted therein, and which have hitherto been concealed. To 
which is added, a SUMMARY EXPOSITION of the Internal Sense of the Prophetical 
Books of the Old Testament, and of the Psalms of David, with a twofold Index. 6 
vols, and INDEX. $17.87. Without the Index, $16.00. 

THE FOUR LEADING DOCTRINES OF THE NEW CHURCH, Signified in 
the Revelation, chap. xxi. by the New Jerusalem; being those respecting The Lord, 
his Divine and Human Natures, and the Divine Trinity; The Sacred Scripture, to 
which is added The White Horse; Faith ; and Life. Neat cambric, 75 cents. 
Each of the above Doctrines may be had separately, namely, 

THE DOCTRINE OF THE NEW JERUSALEM RESPECTING THE LORD. 
12mo. Price $2.00 per dozen, 20 cents single. 

THE DOCTRINE OF THE NEW JERUSALEM RESPECTING THE SACRED 
SCRIPTURE. To which is added, The Treatise on the White Horse. $2.00 
per dozen, 20 cents single without the White Horse, and 25 cents with do. 

THE DOCTRINE OF THE NEW JERUSALEM RESPECTING FAITH. 18mo. 
Half morocco, 25 cents. 

THE DOCTRINE OF LIFE FOR THE NEW JERUSALEM, from the Com- 
mandments of the Decalogue. 12mo. $1.25 per dozen, 12.J cents single. 

ON THE NEW JERUSALEM AND ITS HEAVENLY DOCTRINE. To which 
are prefixed some Observations concerning the New Heaven and the New Earth. 
12mo. $1.37 per dozen, 12J cents single. 

A BRIEF EXPOSITION OF THE DOCTRINES OF THE NEW CHURCH. 
I2mo. $1.60 per doeen, 15 cents single. 

TRUE CHRISTIAN RELIGION; or the Universal Theology op the New 
Church which was foretold by the Lord, Daniel vii. 13, 14, and in the Apocalypse, 
xxi. t, 2. 1 vol. 8vo. Boards, $2.50. With the Coronis, cambric, $3.00. Coronis, 
or Appendix to do. , separate, 37 J cents. 

ON THE A THAN ASIAN CREED. Extracted from the Apocalypse Explained. 
18mo. Half morocco, 50 cents. 

The Wisdom of Angels concerning THE DIVINE LOVE AND DIVINE WIS- 
DOM, Illustrative of the Divine Attributes, of Creation and Redemption, of the Nature 
cf the Eternal World, and of the Human Mind. 8vo. $1.00. 

The Wisdom of Angels concerning THE DIVINE PROVIDENCE, in which the 
Laws of Order are unfolded by which the Divine Government is regulated, especially 
in regard to Man's Salvation. 8vo. $1 50. 

THE TREATISE ON THE DIVINE LOVE AND WISDOM, extracted from the 
Apocalypse Explained. 12mo. Half morocco, 50 cents. 

The Delights of Wisdom concerning CONJUGIAL LOVE. 8vo. Cambric, $2.00. 

THE NATURE OF THE INTERCOURSE BETWEEN THE SOUL AND THE 
BODY, which is supposed to take place either by Physical Influx, or by Spiritual 
Influx, or by Pre-established Harmony. 12mo. $1.00 per dozen, 10 cents single. 

A TREATISE CONCERNING HEAVEN AND ITS WONDERS, AND ALSO 
CONCERNING HELL, being a Relation of Things seen and heard. 12mo. 75 cts. 

A TREATISE CONCERNING THE LAST JUDGMENT AND THE DESTRUC- 
TION OF BABYLON ; showing that all the Predictions contained in the Apoca- 
lypse are at this present day fulfilled. (Elucidatory of the present state of the World). 
Being a Testimony of Things heard and seen. To which is added, a Continuation 

CONCERNINO THE LAST JUDGMENT AND THE SPIRITUAL WOULD. ISmO. Half mO- 

rocco, 50 cents. 



NEW CHURCH BOOKS. 



ON THE EARTHS IN OUR SOLAR SYSTEM, which are called Planets; and 
concerning the Earths in the Starry Heaven ; together with an Account of their 
Inhabitants, and also of the Spirits and Angels there ; from what has been seen and 
heard. 18mo. Half morocco, 50 cents. 

ON THE WORSHIP AND LOVE OF GOD ; treating of the Birth of the Earth, 
of Paradise, and of living Creatures; also of the Nativity, the Infancy, and the Love 
of the first-begotten, or Adam. 12mo. Half morocco, 75 cents. 

A SUMMARY EXPOSITION OF THE INTERNAL SENSE OF THE PRO- 
PHETICAL BOOKS OF THE WoRII OF THE OLD TESTAMENT, and also of 
the PSALMS OF DAVID. With a twofold Index. 12mo. 37* cents. 

ON THE WHITE HORSE mentioned in the Revelation, chap. xix. 6 cts. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

BOOK OF PUBLIC WORSHIP, for the use of the New Church. Prepared by 
order of the General Convention. Cambric, $1.00. 

GROWTH OF THE MIND, with Remarks on some other Subjects. By Sampson 
Reed. 12mo. Cambric, 62J cents. 

SERMONS ON THE LORD'S PRAYER. To which are added Three Sermons 
on other Subjects. By Henry A. Worcester. 12mo. Cambric, 62J cents. 

APHORISMS OF WISDOM; or a Collection of Nine Hundred Maxims and Obser- 
vations on Divine Subjects. 18mo. Boards, 50 cents. 

THE GOLDEN WEDDING RING ; or Observations on the Institution of Mar- 
riage. By Rev. J. Clowes. ISmo. Cambric, 20 cents. 

REMARKS ON SEVERAL ERRORS CONCERNING THE WRITINGS OF 
SWEDENBORG. By Samuel Worcester. 12mo. 20 cents. 

THE GOSPELS OF MATTHEW, MARK, LUKE AND JOHN, Illustrated by 
Extracts from Swedenborg, and with Notes. By Rev. J. Clowes. 4 vols. 8vo. 
Boards, $3.35. 

Also seven volumes Clowes's SERMONS on the Beatitudes, Ten Virgins, 
Marriage of the King's Son, Lord's Prayer and Ten Commandments, De- 
liverance of the Israelites from Egypt; Miscellaneous Sermons; and do. 
preached at St. Johns. 

Clowes's work on Mediums, Twelve Hours of the Day, Two Heavenly Me- 
morialists; on Science; Miscellaneous Thoughts; Jcc 

Also for sale the Works of Rev. Robert Hindmarsh, Rev. M. Sibley, Rev. S. 
Noble, Rev. D. G. Goyder, ice. &c. 



TRACTS. 

THE TRUE OBJECT OF CHRISTIAN WORSHIP DEMONSTRATED, and the 
Doctrine of the Trinity elucidated, and cleared of the Difficulties in which it is com- 
monly involved. By Samuel Noble. 

A DIALOGUE ON THE APOSTOLIC DOCTRINE OF THE ATONEMENT, 
in which that Doctrine is clearly explained. 

THE DOCTRINE of the SCRIPTURES respecting Regeneration and Good Works. 

A FEW PLAIN ANSWERS TO THE QUESTION, " WHY DO YOU RECEIVE 
THE TESTIMONY OF SWEDENBORG ? " 

BRIEF REMARKS on the ATONEMENT and MEDIATION of JESUS CHRIST. 

AN AFFECTIONATE ADDRESS to the Clergy on the Writings of Swedenborg. 



CHILDREN'S BOOKS. 

SUNDAY LESSONS, for the Instruction of Children of the New Church, In Schools 
or at Home. By a Member of the Boston Society of the N. J. 12mo. Camb. 50 cts. 

LESSONS FOR CHILDREN OF THE NEW CHURCH. 16mo. Cambric, 25 cts. 

A CATECHISM FOR THE CHILDREN OF THE NEW CHURCH. By Sam- 
uel Worcester. $1.00 per dozen, 10 cents single. 

THE RAINBOW EXPLAINED ACCORDING TO ITS INTERNAL OR SPI- 
RITUAL MEANING, in the way of Question and Answer. By Rev. J. Clowes. 
81.00 per dozen, 10 cents single. 

THE GOOSEBERRY-BUSH AND CATERPILLARS ; or a True Figure of the 
Bad Passions and their Mischievous Effects. By Rev. J. Clowes. 62* cents per 
dozen, 6i cents single. 

EDWARD AND ELLEN, a Tale. "Beware of ever exceeding the boundaries of 
truth in any mode or form." $1.00 per dozen, 10 cents single. 

MARY AND SUSAN. By the same Author. 62* cents per dozen, 6 cts. «inrie. 

STORIES FOR SMALL CHILDREN. 62i cents per dozen, 6 cent- single 



Date Due